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WBAI 99.5fm 



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VOl.l 00.8 



CAST OF CHARACTERS 



General Manager: Frank Millspaugh 

Assistant Manager: Dale Minor 

Music Director: Ann McMillan 

Drama & Literature Director: Baird Searles 

News Producer: Mike Hodel 

News Producer: Paul Schaffer 



Production Dep't Director: Charles Hobson 
Traffic Director: Olenka Bohachevsky 
Chief Announcer: Steve Post 
Office Manager: Kathy Dobkin 
Chief Engineer: Tom Whitmore 
Subscription Manager: Franc Altman 
Folio Editor: David Kelston 



Board of Directors: Dr. Harold Taylor, Chairman; Robert Goodman, Stephen Fischer, Albert Ruben. 

WBAI's program listings, in the form of this Folio, are published every month as a service to 
subscribers who support our non-profit, non-commercial station at the annual rate $15.00 (student 
subscriptions: $5.00 for 6 months, $10.00 for a year). All donations are tax deductible and checks 
should be made payable to 'Pacifica Foundation — WBAI.' 

WBAI is on the air from Monday to Friday, from 7:00 A.M. to 3:30 A.M., Saturday and Sunday, 
8:00 A.M. to 3:30 A.M. Our transmitter is located in the Empire State Building and we broadcast 
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The Subscription Department is now open Monday through Friday from 10:00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M. 
Phone OX 7-4374-5. 

WBAI is owned and operated by the Pacifica Foundation, a non-profit institution. Other Pacifica 
Stations are KPFA, Berkeley 4, California; and KPFK, Los Angeles 38, California. Subscriptions 
are transferable. 

The duration of programs scheduled is approximate. Dates after listings indicate past or future 
broadcasts. Programs listings are copyrighted (Copyright 1967, WBAI) and are not to be reprinted 
without written permission. Extracts may be reprinted for highlight listings. 



FOLIO NOTES 



AUGUST GOALS 

This month our financial goal is $15,000, including 250 
new subscriptions. If you are one of the 503 subscribers 
whose renewal is due this month, please get it in right away, 
because your renewal is included in the August budget and 
will count toward the $15,000 goal. Also, prompt renewal 
will ensure against delay in Folio delivery. Of course, the 
daily tally will be given on the air each evening at newscast 
time, and avweekly summary will be made during the Report 
to the Listener, Thursdays at 6:45 P.M. Please listen to 
these tallies and reports; they are your best source of in- 
formation as to the station's state of health. 

AUGUST COVER 

This month's cover is a drawing by Erika Weihs. Erika 
Weihs was born in Vienna, Austria, and came to live in 
the U.S. in 1940. She is married to an artist and is the 
mother of two sons. She has had four one man shows ( 1950, 
1961, 1963, 1967) with the ROKO Gallery, and has par- 
ticipated in group shows at the Whitney Museum of Ameri- 
can Art, Carnegie Show, Village Art Center, Lovisco 
Gallery, City Center Gallery, Tulsa Okla. Museum of Art, 
Albany State Capitol Building, Martin Gallery, Purdue Uni- 
versity, Wesleyan College, Obelisk Gallery, Hinckley & 
Brohel, Ball State University, Dulin Gallery of Art, Great- 
er Fall River Art Asso., and the Art Association of New- 
port, L. I. She is represented in the collection of the Phoenix 
Museum of Art and many private collections. 



Erika 'Weihs' drawing was photographed by Nathan 
Rabin. 

AUGUST PROGRAMS 

August programs the staff feels to be of special merit 
include, from the Music Department: Music by Lucia 
Dlugoszewski (Aug. 14, 7:15 P.M.; Aug. 18, 1 P.M.); 
Nasser Rastegar-Nejad playing and singing music in the 
ancient Persian tradition (Aug. 20, 1:45 P.M.; Aug. 25, 
12:45 P.M.); A Concert for Peace, performed at the New 
School (Aug. 23, 7:45 P.M.; Aug. 27, 8 A.M.; and Lady 
Day, a memorial tribute to Billie Holiday from KPFA 
(Aug. 24, 7:15 P.M.; Aug. 30, 12 P.M.). From the Drama 
and Literature Department: Marcel Proust, with Sir Ralph 
Richardson reading from "Swann in Love" (Aug. 3, 8:45 
P.M.; Aug. 4, 2:15 P.M.); How Effective is Social Protest 
Art? (Aug. 10, 8:30 P.M.; Aug. 11, 3 P.M.); 99.5 Radio 
Theatre: "Degrees," a play by George Birimisa and Charles 
Lewis (Aug/22, 8 P.M.; Aug. 31, 11:30 A.M.); and The 
Fisherman and His Soul, a reading of the Oscar Wilde fairy 
tale (Aug. 28, 7:15 P.M.). From the News and Public 
Affairs Department: Report on Greece, by Dale Minor 
(Aug. 1, 8 P.M.; Aug. 3, 12:45 P.M.); The Condition of 
Jewish Belief, a new series to be heard Tuesday evenings, 
starting Aug. 8, at 7 P.M.; M. S. Arnoni on the Middle 
East (Aug. 12, 9 P.M.; Aug. 22, 1 :30 P.M.); and Brooklyn 
CORE, an examination (Aug. 25, 11 P.M. ; Aug. 31,1 P.M.). 



WBAI 



Page 3 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 1 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry has a 
run-in with the news department and is 
thrown off-Mike. 

9:00 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC: 

Matthew Locke (c. 1628-1677): Music for 
His Majesty's Sackbutts and Cornets, 11m.; 
Anthony Holborne (d. 1602) Five Pieces 
for Instrumental Ensemble, 8m.; (London 
Gabrieli Brass Ensemble) (Nonesuch N- 
71118); Heinrich Isaac (c. 1450-1517) Car- 
men Saecularis; Claudin de Sermisy (c. 
1490-1562): Puisqu' En Amour; Du Bien 
Qu' Oeil Absent Ne Peut Choisir; Brihuega 
(15th cent.): Villancico; Vincenzo Galilei 
(1520-1591): Saltarello 6m.; Hayne van 
Ghieseghem (15th cent.): Gentil Calkins; 
Pierre Attaignant (16th cent.): Te Deum; 
Magnificat Primi Toni; Antoine Brumel 
(15th-16th cent.): Vray Dieu D'Amours, 
4m.; Johannes Legrant (15th cent.): Entre 
Vous Nouveaux Maries; Claude Gervaise 
(16th cent.): Danceries; Giovanni Gastoldi 
(d. 1622): Bicinium, 12m.; (Elena Polon- 
ska, Irish Harp; Roger Cotte, recorder; 
Guy Durand, recorder and viele) (Turn- 
about TV 34019S); Tielman Susato (d. 
1561): Suite of Dances (New York Pro 
Musica; Noah Greenberg, dir.) (Decca DL 
9419) 14m.; Michael Praetorius (1571- 
1621): Dances from 'Terpsichore' (Ferdi- 
nand Conrad Instrumental Ensemble) 
(Nonesuch M-71128) 13m. (August 3) 



10:15 WAR SUMMARY: Paul Schaffer's 
account of the Vietnam situation. (July 31) 

10:30 COMMENTARY with Conrad Lynn, 
civil liberties lawyer who continues to de- 
velop his thesis that America approaches 
a revolutionary impasse. (July 3.1) 

10:45 CHRISTIANITY IN CRISIS with 
Robert Ortiz, who gleans the secular and 
the religious press for new developments. 
(July 31) 

11:00 COLLECTORS AND COLLECTING 
#1, Paul Mocsanyi: The first in a series 
of seven discussions on the phenomenon 
of collecting art. In this first lecture, Paul 
Mocsanyi, head of The New School's De- 
partment of Art, introduces the series, de- 
scribes the speakers to come, and discusses 
the general atmosphere in the art world 
during the last twenty years. Recorded at 
the New School on February 1, 1967 by 
Charles Jenulevich. Produced by Rose 
Mary Anderson. 

12:15 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #70: 

Gunther Schuller presents music from the 
year 1928: 

Bela Bartok: String Quartet No. 4 
Arnold Schoenberg: Orchestral Variations, 
Op. 31 

Olivier Messiaen: Le Banquet Celeste (July 
26) 

1:15 MISCELLANY 

1:30 GRAFFITI: The furtively joyous minds 
of New York City lie nakedly exposed by 
scribblings in subways and rest rooms. We 
examine graffiti as poetry with a talented 
but little-known poet. (July 29) 



2:00 SOCIAL LEGISLATION: A History of 
Exclusion of Farm Laborers: Gary Bel- 
low. Deputy Director of California Legal 
Assistance, Inc., former director of O.E.O. 
Planning Council, and former public de- 
fender, Washington, D.C., in a talk before 
the Agriculture-Labor conference at Boult 
Hall on the Berkeley Campus at UC, April 
1967. The conference was sponsored by 
the law students' Civil Rights Research 
Council and a group of organizations in- 
terested in the problems of agricultural 
laborers. (KPFA) (July 31) 

3:00 NEGRO MUSIC: Charles Hobson 
brings us rhythm and blues, calypso and 
gospel and also visits from musicologists 
and musicians. (July 29) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 BAROQUE ORGAN MUSIC: 

Dietrich Buxtehude (1637-1707): Chorale 
Prelude: 'Es 1st Das Heil Uns Kommen 
Her' (Hans Heintze, organ) (Archive ARC 
3115) 2m. 

Nicholas de Grigny (1761-1703): Mass 
(Rene Saorin. organ) (Turnabout TV 
34054S) 16m. 

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Trio 
Sonata No. 1 in E Flat Major (Helmut 
Walcha, organ) (Archive ARC 3124) 13m. 
Francois Couperin (1688-1733): Messe 
Pour les Couvents (Georges Robert, organ) 
(Nonesuch H-71150) 39m. (August 8) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer 

6:45 COMMENTARY with a speaker to be 
announced. (August 2) 



LA CASSETTE BERLITZ 

Qirest-ce que c'est? 



Un moyen tout moderne d'apprendre une langue. 



For more information write to: 
BERLITZ PUBLICATIONS, INC. 

DEPT. 51 • 866 THIRD AVENUE • NEW YORK, N.Y. 10022 
Telephone 935-7985 



PETE WADE SECURITY 7F335 7-10-67 IP Tony 1 



Page 4 



WBAI 



7:00 A REVIEW OF THE NEGRO PRESS: 

A discussion and comparison of the treat- 
ment of national and ethnic news in the 
Negro press. Special attention will be paid 
to news articles of importance that the 
white press did not cover. The primary 
sources are The Amsterdam News, The 
Chicago Defender, The Baltimore Afro- 
American, Jet and The Pittsburgh Courier. 
By Charles Hobson. (Aueust 2) 

7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
CHRISTINE JORGENSEN? Is she or 
isn't she? Can she or can't she? How did 
she first learn of the operation? Has she 
any regrets? What is she doing now (pro- 
fessionally, of course)? Richard Lamparski 
fires awav at the former G.I. who turned 
Ladv for a lifetime. Christine offers advice 
to all who consider takine the same step. 
This proeram is a must for all transvestites. 
(Aueust 2) 

8:00 THF THFATRE AND THE COM- 
MUNITY: Sir Tvrone Guthrie speaking at 
the Walnut Creek Civic Center Theatre 
Workshon on February 4, 1967. (KPFA) 
(Aueust 3) 

9:15 MISCELLANY 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A pe- 
riod reserved for programs of tooical and 
immediate interest in the area of News and 
Public Affairs. (August 2) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: A review of the 
Vietnamese situation with Paul Schaffer, 
with dispatches from Hanoi by Agence 
France-Press. (Aueust 2) 

11:00 SONIA MALKINE: More French 
Troubador songs from Then and Now. 
(Aueu«t 21 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE with Bob 
Fass, who must not, under any circum- 
stances, be linked in any manner, with 
the drug scene . . . whatever that is! 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING with Larry 

Siegel. 
9:00 MUSIC OF THE ITALIAN 

BAROQUE: 

Agostino Steffani (1654-1748): Duet: Placi- 
dissime Gatene Rallentarvi e Crudelta 

(Pilar Lorengar, soprano; Sieglinde Wag- 
ner, alto; Eugen Muller-Dombois, lute; 
Heinz Friedrich Hartig, harpsichord; Paul 
Rainer Zepperitz. contrabass) (Odeon 91 
101) 7m. 

Giovanni Paolo Cima (b. c. 1570): Two 
Spiritual Concertos: Nativitas Tua; Adju- 
ros Vos (Helmut Krebs, tenor; Heinrich 
Haferland, bass-viol; Mathias Siedel, or- 
gan) (Archive ARC 73217) 7m. 
Alessandro Scarlatti (1660-1725): Messa di 
Santa Cecilia (Jean Preston, Blanche Chris- 
tensen, sopranos; Beryl Jensen Smiley, 
alto; Ronald Christensen, tenor; Warren 
Wood, bass; University of Utah Chorus; 
Utah Symphony Orchestra; Maurice 
Abravanel, cond.) (Bach Guild BG-621) 
54m. (August 7) 
10:15 WAR SUMMARY: A rebroadcast of 
yesterday's program. 



10:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
CHRISTINE JORGENSEN? See details 
August 1. 

11:00 COMMENTARY with a speaker to be 
announced. (August 1) 

11:15 A REVIEW OF THE NEGRO PRESS 
with Charles Hobson. Viewpoints not 
readily accessible to white readers. (August 
1) 

11:30 KAREL PACHTA #1: The piano 
^C teacher speaks about the introduction to 
music. This is the first in a series of five 
programs. 

12:15 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: A read- 
ying of the novel by John Wyndham. This 
is the first of eighteen parts. Already a 
classic, this science fiction novel by the 
noted English writer was the basis for the 
film, Village of the Damned. It concerns 
an English village which is literally 
knocked unconscious for a twenty four 
hour period. Several months later all the 
women of the town are found to be preg- 
nant. The novel concerns the children born 
of this event. The reader is Bill Cavness. 
(WGBH) 

12:45 MUSIC OF AARON AND JACOB 
-^CAVSHALOMOV: 

Aaron Avshalomov (1894-1965): Piano 
Concerto in G on Chinese Themes and 
Rhythms (1935) (Margaret Moore, piano; 
Portland Junior Symphony; Jacob Avshal- 
omov, cond.) 28m. 

Jacob Avshalomov (1919-): Cantata: How 
Long, O Lord (1948-9) (Neil Wilson, bari- 
tone; Portland Symphonic Choir; Frank 
Holman, dir.) 15m. (CRI 210) (August 20) 

1:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re- 
broadcast of yesterday's program. 

2:30 BETTER LIVING THROUGH CHEM- 
ISTRY with Larry Josephson. This re- 
broadcast of the July 28 program is the 
last in the series. 

3:00 SONIA MALKINE: The modern 
French troubadour. (August 1) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #72: Gunther Schuller's series 
from the WBAI archives continues, with 
music from the years 1928 and 1929: 
Alexander Mossolov: The Iron Foundry 
William Walton: Concerto for Viola 
Igor Stravinsky: Cappriccio for Piano and 
Orchestra 
(August 8) 

6:00 POEMS: Robert Vas Dias reads his 
own poetry. From WBAI's archives. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with Allard K. Low-' 
enstein, author of The Brutal Mandate, a 
study of South African apartheid. Mr. 
Lowenstein is an attorney and educator, 
and has long been active in the struggle 
for civil rights in the American South, 
Spain and South Africa. (August 3) 

7:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sar- 
ris, film critic for The Village Voice. 
(August 4) 

7:30 A REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel, author of Russia 
Revisited. Mr. Mandel is a widely recog- 
nized authority on the Soviet Union. 
(KPFA) (August 3) 



7:45 SPANISH ART 1967: Bertha Schaeffer 
-^Cof The Bertha Schaeffer gallery speaks 
with a guest. 

9:15 SHAKESPEARE WITH A DIFFER- 
ENCE: Alfred Rothschild, the originator 
of the New Bantam Edition of Shake- 
speare's plays, continues his reading of 
selections. Mr. Rothschild also comments 
on the passages and sets the scene. (August 
4) 

9:45 MISCELLANY 

10:00 JAZZ AT HOME with Chris Albert- 

"T^son and occasional guests. 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: Paul Schaffer's re- 
port on the Vietnam situation. (August 3) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY with Elizabeth 
Vandermei, who brings us modern jazz 
and new music. (August 7) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob's guest, 
an expert in underwater basket-weaving, 
demonstrates this fine art. Don't miss this 
one. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 3 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: If Larry Joseph- 
son shows up on time today, I'll eat the 
hole of a bagel, (hats are passe) 

9:00 AMERICAN STRING QUARTETS: 
Elliott Carter: String Quartet No. 2 (Juilli- 
ard String Quartet) (Victor LM-2481) 21m. 
Arthur Berger: String Quartet (1958) (Len- 
ox String Quartet) (CRI 161) 23m. 
Ross Lee Finney: String Quartet No. 6 in E 
{Stanley Quartet) (CRI 116) (August 8) 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 2) 

10:30 COMMENTARY with Allard K. Low- 
enstein, author of The Brutal Mandate. 
(August 2) 

10:45 A REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel, author of Russia 
Revisited. (August 2) 

11:00 FROM THE CENTER FOR THE 
STUDY FOR DEMOCRATIC INSTITU- 
TIONS #258— Operation Bootstrap #2— 
Self-Concepts: Myth and Mirror: A fifty- 
man delegation from Operation Bootstrap 
continues with staff members of the Center 
discussion of the perceptions, true and 
false, that blacks and whites have about 
Negroes. (July 31) 

11:30 COMMENTARY by a speaker from 
the Socialist Labor Party. (July 30) 

11:45 LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN: 
String Quartet No. 4 in C Minor, Op. 18, 
No. 4 (Budapest String Quartet) (Columbia 
ML 4577) 21m. 

12:15 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: John 
Wyndham's novel read serially by Bill Cav- 
ness. This is part two. 

12:45 THE THEATER AND THE COM- 
MUNITY: A talk by Sir Tyrone Guthrie. 
(KPFA) (August 1) 

2:00 SEXUAL FREEDOM: The Middle 
Road: Dr. Lester Kirkendell, Professor of 
Family Life at Oregon State University, 
and author of The Problems of Remaining 
A Virgin, concludes the symposium on 
"The Pill and the Puritan Ethic," with a 
two-pronged attack on the Puritan right 



WBAI 



Page 5 



and the libertine left, in San Francisco, 
February 12, 1967, Brief question period 
after Kirkendell's address. (July 31) 

3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ: (July 30) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC: 

A program of works by Locke, Holborne, 
Isaac, de Sermisy, Brihuega, van Ghiese- 
ghem. Attaignant, Brumel, Legrant, Gas- 
toldi. Susato and Praetorius. For details 
see August 1, morning concert. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 REPORT TO THE LISTENER with 
Station Manager Frank Millspaugh, who 
gives the latest WBAI news. (August 6) 

7:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 
Frank Millspaugh announces events spon- 
sored by various civic and non-commercial 
organizations. Produced by Susan Crayne. 
(August 4) 

7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES: 
Baird Searles surveys the fields of science 
fiction and fantasy bi-weekly both in the 
printed word (books AND magazines) and 
in the performing arts. (August 6) 

7:30 E. M. FORSTER— AN IMPRESSION 
OF THE AUTHOR: The aims, ideas and 
influence of E. M. Forster are examined 
in this program. It is introduced by Maurice 
Cranston, and includes contributions by 
Noel Annan, William Golding, Frank Ker- 
mode, William Ploner. Santha Rama Rao, 
and the recorded voice of E. M. Forster. 
(BBC) 

8:00 NEW PROPOSALS FOR ANTHRO- 
POLOGISTS: Kathleen Gough Aberle, Re- 
search Associate in Anthropology at the 
University of Oregon, in a recorded talk 
originally given before a joint meeting of 
the Southwestern Anthropological Associ- 
ation and the American Ethnological So- 
ciety on March 24, 1967 in San Francisco. 
(KPFA) (August 4) 

8:30 MISCELLANY 

8:45 MARCEL PROUST — Remembrance 
-^(of Things Past: Sir Ralph Richardson reads 
from a shortened version of "Swann in 
Love" in English. "Swann in Love" is one 
of the sixteen volumes comprising Marcel 
Proust's Remembrance of Things Past. 
(Caedmon TC 2017) (August 4) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 4) 

11:00 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. 
Correspondent Betty Pilkington analyzes 
some turns of U.N. affairs usually ignored 
by the mass media. (August 4) 

11:30 JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH: 
The 15 Two-Part Inventions (George Mal- 
colm, harpsichord) (Nonesuch H-71144) 
20m. (August 7) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass 
with talk and music for insomniacs and 
people who can't sleep and people who 
like his program. 



9:00 SIXTEENTH CENTURY MUSIC: 

Leonard Lechner (c. 1553-1606): Come 
Nave Ch'in Mezzo AlPOnde Sia; Che Piu 
d'un Giorne e la Vita Mortale; Die Musik 
G'schreiben auf Papier; Der Unfall Reit 
Mich Ganz und Gar; Gott B'hute Dich 
(Walther von der Vogelweide Chamber 
Choir of Innsbruck; Othmar Costa, cond.) 
(Mace MCS 9062) 19m.; Jan Pieterszoon 
Sweelinck (1562-1621): Cantiones Sacrae 
(N.R.C.V. Vocal Ensemble, Hilversum; 
Marinus Voorberg, cond.) (Barenreiter 
Musicaphon BM 30 L 1305) 25m.; Pierre 
de Manchicourt (c. 1510-1564): Mass: Quo 
Abiit Dilectus Tuus (Chanteurs de Sainte- 
Eustache; R. P. Emile Martin, cond.) (Edi- 
tions de la Boite a Musique BAM LD 022) 
25m. (August 14) 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 3) 

10:30 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. 
with Betty Pilkington, WBAI's U.N. cor- 



respondent. (August 3) 
11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sar- 

ris, film critic for the Village Voice. 

(August 2) 
11:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 

Announcements by Frank Millspaugh. 

(August 3) 
11:45 SHAKESPEARE WITH A DIFFER- 
ENCE: Readings of selections by Alfred 

Rothschild. (August 2) 

12:15 HANDEL RECITAL: Joan Suther- 
land: 

Arias from Giulio Cesare, Alcina, Samson, 
and Messiah (with the New Symphony 
Orchestra of London and the London Sym- 
phony Orchestra conducted by Richard 
Bonynge and Sir Adrian Boult, and the 
Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, Cov- 
ent Garden, conducted by Francesco 
Molinari-Pradelli) (London 5941) 55m. 
(July 31) 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 4 




7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry comes in 
at 7 a.m., and shocks his listeners. 



IS SOCIAL PROTEST ART EFFECTIVE? Four Angry Artists Against the War in Vietnam, Allen 
D'Arcangelo, Leon Golub, Marc Morrel, and Ad Reinhardt, attempt to evaluate protest art as 
fine art and as protest. Morrel discusses his right as an artist to use the American flag. Listen 
to Socio/ Protest Art, August 10 at 8:30 P.M. and August 11 at 3 P.M. 



Page 6 



WBAI 



1:15 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The third 
reading of John Wyndham's novel. The 
reader is Bill Cavness. 

1:45 NEW PROPOSALS FOR ANTHRO- 
POLOGISTS: A talk by Kathleen Gough 
Aberle. (KPFA) (August 3) 

2:15 MARCEL PROUST: Remembrance of 
Things Past. Sir Ralph Richardson reads 
excerpts from Swann's Way. (August 3) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 TWENTIETH-CENTURY COMPOSI- 
TIONS: 

Henry Brant: Angels and Devils (Concerto 
for Flute Solo with Flute Orchestra) (Fred- 
erick Wilkins, flute solo; Flute Orchestra 
conducted by the composer) (CRI 106) 
21m. 

Virgil Thomson: String Quartet No. 2 
(Juilliard Quartet) (Columbia ML 4987) 
20m. 

Henry Cowell: Trio for Violin, Cello and 
Piano (1965) (Philharmonic Trio) (CRI 
211) 17m. 

Otto Luening and Vladimir Ussachevsky: 
A Poem in Cycles and Bells for tape re- 
corder and orchestra (Members of the 
Royal Danish Orchestra; Otto Luening, 
cond. technical supervision by Vladimir 
Ussachevsky) (CRI 112) 14m. (August 7) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 SPECIAL REPORT: Compiled by the 
Public Affairs Dept. (August 5) 

7:15 COMMENTARY with Thomas Francis 
Ritt, one of the new breed of American 
Catholics. (August 7) 

7:30 ACTUALITE par Theo Loir, journa- 
liste, correspondant a New York de Radio 
Television Beige, et Radio Lausanne. (In- 
terviews, reportages and guest of the week 
— conducted in French) (August 5) 

7:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A period 
reserved for programs of topical and im- 
mediate interest in the area of News and 
Public Affairs. (August 7) 

8:45 MUSIC FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

-^OF CALIFORNIA: 

A concert recorded in the summer of 1966 
with an outstanding performance of the 
Mozart C Minor Concerto. 
Mozart: Overture, La Clemenza di Tito (5) 
Schubert: Symphony No. 3 in D (26) 
Mozart: Concerto No. 24 in C (32) 
Ian Underwood, piano; David Lawton, stu- 
dent orchestra. (KPFA) (August 9) 

10:00 THE WARFARE BETWEEN THE 
INTELLECTUALS AND THE MASS 
MEDIA— #11: Byron Bryant continues 
his series of talks with A Case History on 
Problems of Radio: Father Coughlin. 
(KPFA) (August 8) 
10:30 NEWS with Mike Hodel. 
10:45 WAR SUMMARY: Paul Schaffer's re- 
port on the Vietnam situation. (August 5) 

11:00 THE GOLDEN TREASURY OF 
GREEK POETRY AND PROSE: Pearl C 
Wilson, Professor Emeritus of Greek, 
Hunter College, reads selections from 
Homer and other Greek Poets in the origi- * 
nal language. (Caedmon TC 1034) vSi 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Tonight, 
Bob Fass gets Alice! 



SATURDAY. AUGUST 5 



8:00 CHARLES IVES: The Four Violin 
Sonatas: 

performed by Paul Zukofsky, violin; Gil- 
bert Kalish, piano. (Folkways FM 3346/7) 
80m. (July 29) 

9:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY: See details, August 
4 listings. 

10:45 SPECIAL REPORT: For details of 
this program see August 4 listings. 

11:15 ACTUALITE par Theo Loir, for de- 
tails see August 4 listings. 

11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC with WBAI's 
Chief Engineer, Tom Whitmore. (July 30) 

12:00 THE CLEAR AND PRESENT DAN- 
GER OF THE UNDERPRIVILEGED 
POOR: Saul Alinsky, author and social 
critic, speaking at San Francisco State Col- 
lege on March 9, 1967. (KPFA) 

1:15 AN INTERVIEW WITH ANNETTE 
ROSENSHINE who is 86, and was a 
childhood friend of Alice B. Toklas in San 
Francisco. She went to Paris before Miss 
Toklas and spent two years with the Steins, 
and as such is one of the few people to 
remember Parisian artistic development 
during the first "left bank" days. (KPFA) 

2:00 JAZZ WITH PAT PATRICK 

4:00 PRESS PROBE: Harry Pollard's sub- 
ject for inquiry is Vaughn Marlowe, who 
proposes a plan for aiding victims of the 
war in Vietnam through a group to be 
known as MEDIC. Questioning Mr. Mar- 
lowe are Harold Quigley, leader of the 
Los Angeles Ethical Culture Society; Ed 
Matovich, Physical Scientist and Lecturer 
in Economics and Social Philosophy; Craig 
Kirkpatrick, a member of Mensa and of 
the John Birch Society; Roy Begley, ad- 
vertising counsellor; and Margil Wadley, 
teacher of Social Philosophy. (KPFK) 

5:00 JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH: 

Chorale Preludes Nos. 1-23 from the 
'Orgel-Biicblein' (Helmut Walcha. organ) 
(Archive ARC 3025) 41m. 

5:45 THE DAY OF THE GALAH #6: The 
familiar serial from the BBC in six parts. 
An adventure story set in Australia. This 
is the last episode. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Chuck Lindholm. 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 
Julty. (August 7) 

7:15 TAKING STOCK OF WALL STREET: 
William A. Kent, analyst of Philips, Appel 
and Walden, does a summary of the stock 
market advisory services and tweaks a 
few noses among the financial press. (Au- 
gust 7) 

7:45 EVENINGS ON THE ROOF: Part Two 

■^Cof the Schoenberg Cycle: 

Peter Yates presents the second String 
Quartet by Arnold Schoenberg recorded 
by the Kolisch Quartet and the Serenade 
for Baritone and Septet, recorded by a 
group of Los Angeles musicians directed 
by Robert Craft. (KPFK) (August 10) 

8:45 A WHITE SOUTHERNER TALKS 
ABOUT BLACK POWER: Carl Braden, 
executive director of the Southern Confer- 
ence Education Fund, in a speech at Stan- 
ford University, May 10, 1967. (KPFA) 



9:30 MARSHALL WINDMILLER RE- 

-J(PORTS #1: Pacifica commentator Mar- 
shall Windmiller files two reports from 
London concerning Vietnam. The first is 
an interview with three Americans living 
in London and their attempts to help the 
anti-war struggle. (August 8) 

10:00 NEGRO MUSIC: Charles Hobson 
brings us Blues, Calypso. Gospel and even 
visiting musicians and musicologists. (Au- 
gust 8) 

11:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #49: Brecht 
on "love" presented with songs, poems and 
scenes. (August 10) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE: This program was 
prepared with the help of Reuters, The 
Associated Press, and The National En- 
quirer. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 6 



8:00 BACH CANTATAS: 

Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): Can- 
tata No. 93: 'Wer nur den lieben Gott lasst 
walten' (Ingeborg Reichelt, soprano; Lotte 
Wolf-Matthas, alto; Johannes Feyerabend, 
tenor; Hans-Olaf Hudemann, bass; Gott- 
ingen City Chorus; Frankfurt Cantata Or- 
chestra; Ludwig Doorman, cond.) (Van- 
guard SRV-241) 22m.; Cantata No. 204: 
'Ich bin in mir vergniigt' (Elisabeth Speiser, 
soprano; Wlirttemberg Chamber Orches- 
tra, Heilbronn: Rudolph Ewerhart, cond.) 
(Turnabout TV 34127S) 35m.; Cantata No. 
140: 'Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme' 
(Anny Felbermayer. soprano; Alfred Uhl, 
tenor; Hans Braun, baritone; Choir and 
Orchestra of the Bach Guild; Felix Pro- 
haska, cond.) (Bach Guild BG-511) 30m. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEOPLES: 
the late Dr. Henry Cowell's series contin- 
ues. (From the WBAI archives) 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher 
with more operatic recordings of the past. 
(KPFA) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER with 
WBAI's Station Manager, Frank Mills- 
paugh. (August 3) 

10:45 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
with Baird Searles. For details see August 
3. 

11:00 BARBARA DEMING AND LOUIS 
LOMAX: Two Views of War and Peace: 
Miss Deming, writer, speaker, associate of 
A. J. Muste and recent visitor to North 
Vietnam, and Mr Lomax, writer, televi- 
sion commentator who also recently vis- 
ited South East Asia, talk about their ob- 
servations on Asia and their significance. 
(KPFK) 

12:45 LONDON FESTIVAL OF AMERI- 
CAN ARTS AND HUMANITIES: Ober- 
lin Baroque Ensemble: 
Their London debut, recorded in the 
theater of the American Embassy. 
Strungk: Trio Sonata #18 in D 
Elliott Carter: Sonata for flute, oboe, 'cello, 
and harpsichord (1952) 
Boyce: Sonata #2 in F 
Handel: Sonata #11 for oboe and continuo 
Henry Cowell: Set of Four— Quartet for 
flute, oboe, 'cello and harpsichord 
J. S. Bach: Trio Sonata in G. (KPFA) 



WBAI 



Page 7 



1:45 HERBERT GOLD INTERVIEWED 
BY FRED CODY: Herbert Gold, author 
of The Fathers, interviewed by Fred Cody 
of Cody's bookstore in Berkeley. (KPFA) 

2:15 OUT OF MY LEAGUE: George Plimp- 
ton, who departs from his job as editor of 
the Paris Review to pitch against major 
league ballplayers and to play quarterback 
with the pro football Detroit Lions. Mr. 
Plimpton talks about sports from a unique 
vantage point. The interviewer is Mike 
Hodel, who has done neither of these 
things. 

2:45 COLLECTORS AND COLLECTING 

-^f#6: In the sixth of this series of talks. 
Governor Nelson Rockefeller speaks about 
the role of the private collector. He de- 
scribes the origins of his interest in art 
and the difficulties he encountered both in 
introducing contemporary art of political 
artists like Rivera to capitalist institutions 
like Rockefeller Center. Recorded at The 
New School by Charles Jenulevich in 
March, 1967. Produced by Rose Mary 
Anderson. To be rebroadcast in September. 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY with Bob Fass 
and the best of Radio Unnameable. 

5:00 CALIFORNIA RURAL LEGAL AS- 
SISTANCE: A Possible Means to End Pov- 
erty: Daniel Lund, Director of Community 
Relations for the California Rural Legal 
Assistance agency, speaking at the Agri- 
Labor Conference at Boalt Hall on the 
Berkeley Campus at U.C. April 1, 1967. 
(KPFA) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC with Tom Whit- 
more, WBAI's Chief Engineer. (August 12) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with a speaker from 
the Socialist Labor Party. (August 10) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN: A variety of books on a variety 
of topics reviewed by a variety of critics. 
(August 7) 

7:15 RENDEZVOUS: Varietes francaises a 
New York; spectacles, arts, lettres et idees 
a l'ordre du jour. Une emission realisee 
avec le concours des Services Culturels 
francais et presentee en francais par Odette 
de la Tour et Jean-Louis de Turenne. 

8:15 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE: A multiple 
criticism of current events in the arts of 
dance, film, theatre, music, painting pnd 
literature which are reviewed specifically 
and then discussed generally by the per- 
sonnel. They vary, but will probably be, 
in this edition. John Wilson (music), Ron 
Nelson (theatre), Al Lees (liim), Sam 
Blazer (literature). Gene Thornton (a: ani 
architecture), and Baird Sear'es (dance), 
who also moderates. The production 
assistant is Judy Green. (August iO) 

9:30 MODEST MUSSORGSKY ( 1 839- i $81): 
Pictures at an Exhibition (original version 
for piano) (Sviatoslav Richter. piunc) (Co- 
lumbia ML 5600) 29m. 

10:00 THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THE 
LEGISLATURE AS AN INSTITUTION: 
Jesse M. Unruh. speaker of the State As- 
sembly and noted California political fig 
ure, speaking at the League of Women 
Voters state convention in San Francsco 
on April 19, 1967. (KPFA) 

10:45 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING; Mike 
Hodel looks at the week's coming pro- 
grams. (August 7) 



11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Ira Git- 

ler. (August 10) 
12:00 THE OUTSIDE with Steve Post, 

WBAI's Fatty-In-Residence. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 7 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry Joseph- 
son eats it! (A bagel, of course) 

9:00 TWENTIETH CENTURY COMPOSI- 
TIONS: For details of this program see 
August 4 listings. 

10:15COMMENTARY with Thomas Fran- 
cis Ritt. (August 4) 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS: A re 
broadcast of Sam Julty's August 5 pro- 
gram. 

11:00 TAKING STOCK OF WALL 
STREET with William Kent, WBAI's 
analyst. (August 5) 

11:30 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING: For 
details of this program see August 6 list- 
ings. 

11:45 JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH: 
The fifteen two-part inventions. (August 3) 

12:15 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The 
fourth reading (by Bill Cavness) of John 
Wyndham's novel. 

12:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re 
broadcast of the August 4 program. 

1:45 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN with a variety of critics. (August 6) 

2:00 FROM THE MIDWAY #1170: Rich- 
ard McKeon, the Charles F. Grey Distin- 
guished Service Professor in the Depart- 
ments of Philosophy and Classical Lan- 
guages and Literature at the University of 
Chicago, will discuss Man and Mankind 
in the Development of Culture and the 
Humanities. 

3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY: a repeat of 
Elizabeth Vandermei's August 2 program. 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 MUSIC OF THE ITALIAN 
BAROQUE 
For details, see August 2 listings. 

6:15 MISCELLANY^ 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn, 
civil liberties lawyer. (August 8) 

7:00 MARTHA GRAHAM: Her Contribu- 
"TCtion to Contemporary Dance (1966): pro- 
duced by Ann McMillan (from the WBAI 
Archives). (August 16) 

8:30 SEARCH FOR SURVIVAL #1: The 
-^COnly Good Indian . . . : The first of four 
programs on the history, culture, and pres- 
ent political problems of the American In- 
dian. This documentary written by David 
Ossman, sets forth the history of the 
Original Americans and their systematic 
destruction by European conquerors. Pro- 
duced by David Ossman and Michael Day- 
ton. (KPFK) (August 11) 

9:30 ARTS EXTRA: A time period left open 
for programs of immediate interest from 
the Drama and Literature Department. 
These programs will usually be resched- 
uled in a later folio after broadcast on 
A Look At the Listening, Sunday evenings. 
(August 10) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: Paul Schaffer in 



a nightly review of the Vietnam situation. 

(August 8) 
11:00 FRANZ KAFKA— Stories: Lotte Len- 
"Jtya reads The Hunger Artist, and a half 

dozen other short sketches by Franz Kafka. 

These stories are among the few which 

Kafka permitted to be published during 

his lifetime. (Caedmon TC 1114) (August 

11) 
12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Musical 

and verbal non sequiturs — a mixed bag. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 8 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Lets hear it 
from the housewives in Queens this morn- 
ing. 

9:00 BAROQUE ORGAN MUSIC: Music 
by Buxtehude, Grigny. J. S. Bach and Cou- 
perin. For details of the program, see Au- 
gust 1 listings. 

10-L5 WAR SUMMARY: A rebroadcast of 
the Paul Schaffer report. (August 7) 

10:30 COMMENTARY with Conrad Lynn. 
(August 7) 

10:45 COLLECTORS AND COLLECTING 
#2: Sam Kootz. former dean of New York 
art gallery managers, talks on The Gallery 
and The Collector. (July 9) 

11:45 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #72: For details of this program 
see August 2 listings. With Gunther 
Schuller. 

1:00 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: Part five 
of the reading by Bill Cavness of John 
Wyndham's novel. 

1:30 MARSHALL WINDMILLER RE- 
PORTS #1: Part one of the report from 
London concerning Vietnam. (August 5) 

2:00 TAOS BOOK SHOP: A conversation 
with Genevieve Jansen and Claire Morrell. 
co-owners of a little book shop in Taos, 
New Mexico from which many activities 
in that extraordinary valley originate. Erik 
Bauersfeld recorded in Taos. Sept., 1966. 
(KPFA) (August 12) 

2:30 THE WARFARE BETWEEN INTEL- 
LECTUALS AND THE MASS MEDIA— 
#11: Byron Bryant continues his series of 
talks with A Case History on Problems of 
Radio: Father Coughlin. (KPFA) (August 
4) 

3:00 NEGRO MUSIC with Charles Hobson. 
(August 5) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 2 1 . 

5:00 AMERICAN STRING QUARTETS: 
Quartets by Elliott Carter. Arthur Berger 
and Ross Lee Finney. For details, see the 
August 3 morning concert. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with a speaker to be 
announced. (August 9) 

7:00 THE CONDITION OF JEWISH BE- 

-^CLIEF #1: In this new series distinguished 
Rabbis and theologians tell of their be- 
liefs on the Torah as "divine revelation." 
the Jews as the "chosen people of God." 
Judaism as the one "true religion." and 
similar questions. Today's contributor is 
Rabbi Norman Lamm, of the (Orthodox) 
Jewish Center in New York City. (August 
13) 



Page 8 



WBAI. 



'Great 
cogency 
and wit" 

—Gibson A. Danes, 
Yale Univ. 




Discovering 
Modern Art 



The Intelligent Layman's 

Guide to Fainting from 

Impressionism to Pop 

By JOHN P. SEDGWICK, Jr. 

56 illustrations, 

11 in full color. $7.95 

Now at your bookstore — or 

use this coupon to order 




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457 Madison Ave., New York 10022 
Please send me DISCOVERING MODERN ART, 
for which I enclose check or money order 
for $7.95. If not completely delighted with 
this book, I may return it within 10 days 
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7:30 A CONVERSATION WITH NOR- 
MAN THOMAS: Richard Lamparski talks 
with the Grand Old Man of Socialism at 
his home on Long Island. In this one hour 
conversation Mr. Thomas reminisces about 
his campaigns for the Presidency, Eugene 
V. Debs, Franklin D. Roosevelt, "America 
First," and the Townsend Plan. (August 9) 

8:30 THE CHALLENGE OF OUR TIME: 
Conservative Social Habits versus Revolu- 
tionary Technological Change #1 — The 
Challenge: Historian Arnold Toynbee in 
the first of two lectures at Stanford Uni- 
versity. Recorded April 20. 1967 (August 
15) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A pe- 
riod reserved for topics of immediate in- 
terest. (August 9) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: A review of the 
Vietnam situation by Paul Schaffer, with 
dispatches from Hanoi by Agence France- 
Press (August 9) 

11:00 MARIAN McPARTLAND: More mu- 
sic from the lovely lady pianist. (August 9) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Love 
spelled backwards is E-V-O-L. 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 9 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry Joseph- 
son delivers a eulogy for the night. 
9:00 MUSIC BY FRENCH COMPOSERS: 

Gabriel Faure (1845-1924): Quintet No. 2 
for Piano and Strings in C Minor, Op. 115 
(Gaby Casadesus, piano; Guilet String 
Quartet) (MGM E3166) 20m. 
Vincent d'Indy (1851-1931): Suite in Olden 
Style, Op. 24 for trumpet, two flutes and 
strings (Harry Glantz, trumpet; Julius 
Baker, Claude Monteux, flutes; Philip 
Sklar, bass; Guilet String Quartet) (MGM 
E3096) 15m. 

Maurice Ravel (1875-1918): Ondine (Wal- 
ter Gieseking, piano) (Angel 35273) 6m. 
Claude Debussy (1862-1918): Jeux (Or- 
chestre National de la Radiodiffusion 
Francaise; D. E. Inghelbrecht, cond.) (An- 
gel 35678) 19m. (August 11) 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 8) 

10:30 A CONVERSATION WITH NOR- 
MAN THOMAS: See details August 8. 

11:30 COMMENTARY with a speaker to 
to be announced. (August 8) 

11:45 KAREL PACHTA, piano teacher, 
speaks about the teaching of music. This- 
is the second in a series of five program?.. 

12:15 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: Sixth 
reading by Bill Cavness of John Wynd- 
ham's novel. 

12:45 MUSIC FROM THE UNIVERSITY 
OF CALIFORNIA: For details of this pro- 
gram of Mozart and Schubert, see August 
4 listing. (KPFA) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re- 
peat of the August 8 broadcast. 

3:00 MARIAN McPARTLAND SHOW: 
More music by the lovely lady pianist. 
(August 8) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 



5:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #73: Gunther Schuller's series 
continues with music from 1929-30: 
Samuel Barber: Serenade for Strings 
Ottorino Respighi: Roman Festivals 
Amadeo Roldan: Ritmicas 
(August 15) 

6:00 THE BAKER'S STORY: One of the 
series of Enzo the Barber stories, written 
and told by Joe Papaleo. From the WBAI 
archives 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with Allard K. Low- 
enstein, author of The Brutal Mandate and 
worker for civil liberties. (August 10) 

7:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sards, 
Film Critic for the Village Voice. (August 
11) 

7:30 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel, noted authority on 
the Soviet Union. (August 10) 

7^45 ELIE SIEGMEISTER presents his mu- 

T^ic. We hear Violin and Piano Sonata No. 
3; Piano Sonata No. 2, among other works. 
(From the WBAI Archives) 

9:00 MISCELLANY 

9:15 KNOWLEDGE WITHOUT WALLS 
#1: A series of lecture-discussion pro- 
grams by faculty members of San Fran- 
cisco State College devoted to re-thinking 
academic disciplines in response to con- 
temporary experiences. The introduction 
to the series is given by Dr. Otto Butz, 
Professor of Social Science. (KPFA) 

10:00 JAZZ AT HOME with Chris Albert- 
son and occasional guests. 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: Paul Schaffer's 
daily report on the Vietnam situation. (Au- 
gust 10) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY: New jazz pre- 
sented by Elizabeth Vandermei. (August 
14) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: If you have 
nothing better to do, try writing 31 of these 
ridiculous comments in one sitting — then 
mail them to WBAI. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 10 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: There is only 
a fine, sometimes undistinguishable line 
between comedy and tragedy. 

9:00 BELA BARTOK: 

Hungarian Sketches (Chicago Symphony 
Orchestra; Fritz Reiner, cond.) (Victor LM 
2374) 10m.; Fourteen Bagatelles, Op. 6 
(Tibor Kozma, piano) (Bartok 918) 26m.; 
Contrasts for Violin, clarinet and piano 
(Robert Mann, violin; Stanley Drucker, 
clarinet; Leonid Hambro, piano) (Bartok 
916) 15m.; The Wooden Prince, Op. 13 
(Symphony Orchestra of the Southwest 
German Radio, Baden-Baden; Rolf Rein- 
hardt, cond.) (Turnabout TV 34086S) 24m. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 9) 

10:30 COMMENTARY with Allard K. Low- 
enstein. (August 9) 

10:45 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel. (August 9) 



WBAI 



Page 9 



11:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE: Reviews 
and discussions on the arts. For details see 
August 6 listings. 

12:15 COMMENTARY by a representative 
of the Socialist Labor Party. (August 6) 

12:30 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS read by 
Bill Cavness. Part seven of the serializa- 
tion of John Wyndham's novel. 

1:00 EVENINGS ON THE ROOF: Program 
#2 of the Schoenberg Cycle. For details, 
see August 5 listings. 

2:00 ARTS EXTRA:" The program of Au- 
gust 7. 

3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Ira Gitler. 
(August 6) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #49: For 
details of this program please refer to 
August 5 listings. 

6:00 SOUTH VIETNAM: THE DILEMMA 
OF U.S. POLICY— Forum: Arnold Biech- 
man, Robert Browne. From the WBAI 
Archives. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 REPORT TO THE LISTENER: Sta- 
tion Manager Frank Millspaugh reveals 
the inner workings of WBAI. (August 13) 

7:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 
Frank Millspaugh announces some of the 
major events (Sponsored by various civic 
organizations) of the coming week. All are 
open to the general public. Produced by 
Susan Crayne. (August 11) 

7:15 CHANGES: Alan Watts introduces 
■7X Timothy Leary, Gary Snyder, and Allen 
Ginsberg for a discussion on LSD and 
other things. The session took place on 
Mr. Watts' houseboat in Sausalito, and 
was transcribed in its entirety in the San 
Francisco Oracle. The portions of the dis- 
cussion on this program were edited and 
produced by Duncan Ray. (KPFA) (Au- 
gust 17) 

8:30 HOW EFFECTIVE IS SOCIAL PRO- 
"7* TEST ART? As fine art? Allen D'Arcan- 
gelo, Leon Golub, Marc Morrel and Ad 
Reinhardt who have been deeply involved 
in the Angry Artists Protest Against the 
War in Vietnam, evaluate the Collage of 
Indignation, Picasso's Guernica and Marc 
Morrel's right of free expression to use the 
American flag. Jeanne Siegel moderates. 
(August 1 1) 

9:30 TALK-BACK: A live discussion on cur- 
rent events, followed by a period during 
which listeners may ask questions of the 
participants by calling OX 7-8506. Pro- 
duced by Andy McGowan. 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: A review of the 
Vietnam situation by Paul Schaffer, with 
dispatches from Hanoi by Agence France- 
Press, the French wire service. (August 11) 

11:00 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. 
with Betty Pilkington. (August 11) 

11:30 MUSIC FROM THE RYUKYU 

-^ISLANDS, PART 1: The first part of a 
three-program series on the music of the 
Ryukyu Islands, which include Okinawa, 
presented by Robert Garfias, Professor of 
Music at the University of Washington. 
(KPFA) (August 14) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass 
free-associates. (Or maybe — Bob Fass — 
free Associates) 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 11 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING, live, from 
WBAI's posh, lavish studios in ritzy Mur- 
ray Hill — Larry, The J! 

9:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC: 

Leon Kirchner (19 19-): Concerto for Vio- 
lin, Cello, Ten Winds and Percussion 
(Tessy Spivakovsky, violin; Aldo Parisot, 
cello; Ensemble under the composer's di- 
rection) (Epic LC 3830) 18m. 
George Rochberg (191 8-); Night Music 
(Grace Whitney, cello; Louisville Orches- 
tra; Robert Whitney, cond.) (Louisville 
623) 12m. 

Luigi Dallapiccola (1904-): Variazioni Per 
Orchestra (Louisville Orchestra; Robert 
Whitney, cond.) (Louisville 545) 14m. 
Ben Weber (1916): Symphony on Poems 
of William Blake (Warren Galjour, bari- 
tone; Orchestra conducted by Leopold 
Stokowski) (CRI 120) 29m. (August 25) 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 10) 

10:30 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. 
with Betty Pilkington. (August 10) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Village Voice 
film critic, Andrew Sarris. (August 9) 

11:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 
Announcements of civic events by Frank 
Millspaugh. (August 10) 

1 1:45 MUSIC FROM NORTHERN JAPAN: 
Taiko Itabashi talks about the folk music 
of her native region with Diana Beirne. 
Illustrated with recordings of outstanding 
folk singers and musicians. (August 19) 

12:30 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: Eighth 
episode in Bill Cavness' reading from the 
novel by John Wyndham. 

1:00 FRANZ KAFKA— Stories: Lotte Len- 
ya reads The Hunger Artist and others. 
(August 7) 

2:00 SEARCH FOR SURVIVAL— The Only 
Good Indian . . . : The first in a series on 
the problems of the American Indian. 
(KPFK) (August 7) 

3:00 HOW EFFECTIVE IS SOCIAL PRO- 
TEST ART? Jeanne Siegel moderates on 
a panel of four artists. (August 10) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 MUSIC BY FRENCH COMPOSERS: 
Gabriel Faure. Vincent d'Indy, Maurice 
Ravel and Claude Debussy. For details of 
the program see August 9 listing. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 SPECIAL REPORT: A current news 
event studied in detail. (August 12) 

7:15 COMMENTARY with Thomas Fran- 
cis Ritt, who has been described as a mem- 
ber of the "New Breed" of American 
Catholic. (August 14) 

7:30 ACTUALITE par Theo Loir, journa- 
liste, correspondant a New York de Radio 
Television Beige, et Radio Lausanne. In- 
terviews, reportages and guest of the week. 
(August 12) 

7:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A pe- 
riod reserved for programs of immediate 
interest. (August 14) 



8:45 THE HORROR FILM: Carlos Clarens, 
author of An Illustrated History of the 
Horror Film, talks with Baird Searles about 
the history and aesthetic of the horror 
film, as well as about science fiction and 
(purposeful) horror television. (August 18) 

9:30 THE MULHAUSEN ORGAN: The 
story of "an ideal and perfect organ" built 
from a design by J. S. Bach in the late 
1950's. The design was found more than 
250 years after its origin. (East German 
Radio) (KPFK) 

10:00 THE WARFARE BETWEEN IN- 
TELLECTUALS AND THE MASS 
MEDIA — #12: Byron Bryant continues 
his series of talks with Television and the 
Intellectuals. (KPFA) (August 17) 

10:30 NEWS with Mike Hodel. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: Paul Schaffer's 
account of the Vietnam situation. (August 
12) 

11:00 FORBUSH AND THE PENGUINS: 
A play for radio, adapted from his novel, 
by Graham Billings. Electronic music pre- 
pared by Robin Maconie. This production 
was the New Zealand Broadcasting Corpo- 
ration's entry for the 1966 Italian Prize. 
Recorded in New Zealand for the North 
American Broadcasting Company. (KPFA) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass, 
with ... I forgot what I was going to say. 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 12 



8:00 SYMPHONIES BY HAYDN: 

Josef Haydn: Symphonies No. 1 in D Ma- 
jor, No. 13 in D Major, No. 28 in A Major 

(Haydn Orchestra, Bolzano; Antonio Pe- 
drotti, cond.) (Turnabout TV 34128S) 42m. 
Symphonies No. 31 in D Major ("Horn- 
signal"), No. 59 in A Major ("Fire") (Bach 
Collegium, Stuttgart; Helmuth Rilling, 
cond.) (Turnabout TV 3401 OS) 42m. 

9:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 1 1) 

11:00 SPECIAL REPORT: A repeat broad- 
cast of the August 1 1 program. 

11:15 ACTUALITE par Theo Loir. (August 

11) 

11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC with WBAI's 
Chief Engineer, Tom Whitmore. (August 6) 

12:00 THE SEVEN STEPS FOUNDA- 
TION: Recorded at San Quentin Prison, 
this is a typical meeting of the Seven Steps 
Foundation, which was set up to help 
prisoners adjust to life behind bars, and 
to help the men get rid of their resentments 
against society. This program was pro- 
duced for KPFA by Jack Lind. (KPFA) 

1:30 THE TAOS BOOK SHOP: A conversa- 
tion with Genevieve Jansen and Claire 
Morrell, co-owners of a little book shop 
in Taos, New Mexico from which many 
activities in that extraordinary valley origi- 
nate. Erik Bauersfeld recorded in Taos, 
September 1966. (KPFA) (August 8) 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF FOLK MUSIC: 

-^Hostesses Tracey McNamara and Jones 
Alk discuss and play folk music from all 
over the world (including the United 
States). 



Page 10 



WBAI 



4:00 COMMUNITY DISCUSSION PROJ- 
ECT— The Vietnam War and the Latin 
American Revolution: John Gerassi. Pro- 
fessor of Journalism at New York Univer- 
sity, speaking under the auspices of U. S. 
Committee for Justice for Latin American 
Political Prisoners. (KPFK) 

5:00 CLAUDIO MONTEVERDI (1567- 
1643): 

Magnificat (Elisabeth Speiser, Barbary 
Lange, sopranos; Derek McCulloch, alto; 
Helmuth Geiger, bass; Kurt Huber, Ernst 
Hauser. tenors: Spandauer Kantorei; Hel- 
muth Rilling, cond.) (Turnabout TV 
34099S) 21m. 

Selections from the Eighth book of Madri- 
gals (1638): Dolcissimo Uscignolo 4m.; 
Hor ch'el ciel e la terra 10m.; Altri canti 
di Marte 10m.; Perche t'en fuggi o Fillide 
8m.; II Combattimento de Tancredi e Clo- 
rinda 20m.; (Vocal and Instrumental Solo- 
ists of the Societa Cameristica di Lugano; 
Edwin Loehrer, dir.) (Nonesuch H-1090; 
H-1092) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Chuck Lindholm. 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 
Julty. (August 14) 

7:00 TAKING STOCK OF WALL STREET 
with William A Kent, analyst of Philips, 
Appel and Walden, interviews economists, 
stock market analysts, and authors with 
an iconoclastic view on Wall Street. (Au- 
gust 14) 

7:30 CLIFFORD MASON ON THEATER: 
The first of a new series of bi-weekly 
looks at American theater and motion pic- 
tures by a young playwright and critic. Mr. 
Mason, in this program, gives a brief his- 
tory of Negro theater in the U.S. and con- 
tends that the roles given to even such 
prominent actors as Sidney Poitier con- 
tinue to maintain the image of American 
Negroes as not-really human. Produced 
by Rose Mary Anderson. (August 22) 

8:00 ALBAN BERG'S "LULU" Dr. Walter 
Duclos gives an introduction and plot sum- 
mary of Berg's unfinished masterpiece on 
the occasion of the San Francisco Opera's 
performance in the 1965 season. Recorded 
by Ray Bridge at an Opera Preview, spon- 
sored by the San Francisco Junior League, 
originally given on September 23, 1965 at 
the Hotel Mark Hopkins. (KPFA) 

9:00 M. S. ARNONI ON THE MIDDLE 

-TCEAST: The editor of the Minority of One 
airs his views on the short war and the 
longer-range developments and problems. 
(August 22) 

10:00 NEGRO MUSIC: Charles Hobson 
brings us. Calypso, gospel, blues, R&R and 
R&B, with guest musicians and musicol- 
ogists. (August 15) 



11:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #50: Selec 
tions, chiefly musical, from two German 
plays, Puntila, with music by Paul Dessau 
and Trumpets and Drums with music by 
Wagner-Regny. (August 17) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE: Steve's special guest 
tonight will be Frank (what mimeograph 
machine?) Millspaugh. 




8:00 MUSIC BY KARLHEINZ STOCK- 
HAUSEN (1928): 

Zyklus (Christoph Caskel, percussion) 
(Time 58001) 12m. 

Gesang der Jiinglinge (Realisation in the 
Electronic Studio of WDR, Cologne) 
(Deutsche Grammophon SLPM 138 811) 
13m. 

Momente (1965 version) (Martin Arroyo, 
soprano; Aloys Kontarsky, hammond or- 
gan; Alfons Kontarsky, lowery organ; 
Chorus and Members of the Symphony 
Orchestra of Radio Cologne; Karlheinz 
Stockhausen, cond.) (Nonesuch H-71157) 
57m. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES: The series from WBAI's archives by 
the late Dr. Henry Cowell continues. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher 
with operatic recordings of the past. 
(KPFA) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER with 
Station Manager, Frank Millspaugh. (Au- 
gust 10) 

10:45 THE JEW IN THE GLOBAL MAIN- 
STREAM: South African Jewry; Politi- 
cally Mute and Literally Vocal: The final 
lecture in a series of four presented by 
Louis Shub, Director of the Library of the 
University of Judaism, given in the fall of 
1966 under the auspices of the University 
Institute of the University of Judaism. 
(KPFK) 

12:00 SAMSON: 

The complete oratorio by George Freder- 
ick Handel (Jan Peerce, Kenly Whitelock, 
tenor; Phyllis Curtin, Jean Preston, so- 
pranos; Louise Parker, contralto; Roy 
Samuelson, baritone; Malcom Smith, bass; 
University of Utah Symphonic Chorale; 
Utah Symphony Orchestra; Maurice 
Abravanel, cond.) (Bach Guild BG-648/50) 
152m. 

2:45 COLLECTORS AND COLLECTING 

■7C#7: Dr. Wagner Munsterberger, psycho- 
analyst, psychologist and art expert, speaks 
on Why Do We Collect? in the last of this 
series of talks on art collecting. Dr. Mun- 
sterberger speaks from the psychoanalytic 



point of view — what are the unconscious 
motives for this incurable disease. Re- 
corded at The New School by Charles 
Jenulevich in March, 1967. To be rebroad- 
cast in September. 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY with Bob Fass. 
archives. 

5:00 THE CONDITION OF JEWISH BE- 
LIEF #1 featuring Rabbi Norman Lamm 
of the Jewish Center. (August 8) 

5:30 EIGHT UNDERGRADUATE POEMS 
OF T. S. ELIOT: Dick Elman introduces. 
Reader Leo Trachtenberg. From the WBAI 
archives 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC with WBAI's Chief 
Engineer, Tom Whitmore. (August 19) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Harry Goodman. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with a representative 
from the Socialist Labor Party. (August 17) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN: A variety of books reviewed by a 
variety of critics. (August 14) 

7:15 RENDEZVOUS: Varietes franchises a 
New York; spectacles, arts, lettres, et idees 
a l'ordre du jour. Une emission realisee 
avec le concours des Services Culturels 
francais et presentee en francais par 
Odette de la Tour et Jean-Louis de 
Turenne. 

8:15 IL RITORNO D'ULISSE IN PATRIA: 

-^CThe opera by Claudio Monteverdi (1567- 
1643) (Soloists and the Santini Chamber 
Orchestra; Rudolph Ewerhart, cond.) (Vox 
DLBX 211) 124m. 

10:30 MISCELLANY 

10:45 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING with 
Mike Hodel, who previews the best pro- 
grams of the week. (August 14) 

11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Don 
-^CSchlitten, an art director for Prestige Rec- 
ords, long-time student of jazz history and 
noted jazz photographer. (August 17) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE: Maybe Steve will 
knock your ethnic group tonight . . 



MONDAY, AUGUST 14 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: If Steve didn't 

Larry will. 
9:00 MUSIC BY VIVALDI AND BACH 

Antonio Vivaldi (1680-1743): Cantata 
Cessate, Omai (Laerte Malaguti, baritone 
Orchestra of the Societa Cameristica di 
Lugano; Edwin Loehrer, cond.) (None- 
such H-1088) 11m.; Te Deum in D Major 
(Agnes Giebel, soprano; Marga Hoffgen, 
contralto; Chorus and Orchestra of the 
Teatro la Fenice, Vinice; Vittorio Negri, 
cond.) (Philips PHS900-090) 18m. 



WBAI OFFERS STUDENTS PLANNING TO GO TO EUROPE THIS SUMMER AN INTERNATIONAL STUDENT IDENTITY 
CARD. BY CARRYING THIS CARD WITH YOU IN EUROPE, YOU MAY BE ABLE TO SAVE AS MUCH AS $300 THIS SUMMER. 
IT ALLOWS YOU TO STAY IN STUDENT HOTELS WHICH COST $1 TO $2 A NIGHT— WITH NO CURFEW— AND TO EAT 
IN STUDENT RESTAURANTS FOR AS LITTLE AS 60(Z A MEAL. IT ALSO GETS YOU DISCOUNTS IN THEATERS, CINEMAS, 
MUSEUMS AND STORES. BUT THE BIGGEST SAVINGS COME ON STUDENT TRANSPORTATION IN EUROPE— FLIGHTS, 
TRAINS, BUSES AND SHIPS. FOR EXAMPLE, A COMMERCIAL FLIGHT FROM AMSTERDAM TO ATHENS COSTS $137. WITH 
THE ID CARD YOU CAN TAKE A STUDENT FLIGHT FOR ONLY $50. THE SAME HUGE DISCOUNTS APPLY ON FLIGHTS 
CONNECTING THIRTY OTHER EUROPEAN CITIES. 

TO GET YOUR ID CARD, SEND $2 IF YOU ATTEND A NATIONAL STUDENT ASSOCIATION MEMBER SCHOOL, OR $4 IF 
YOU ATTEND A NON-MEMBER SCHOOL; A PASSPORT PHOTO; AND PROOF OF YOUR STUDENT STATUS TO WBAI. 
YES, WBAI GETS PART: 50£ PER CARD. MAIL TO: STUDENT TRAVEL, WBAI-FM, 30 EAST 39TH STREET, NEW YORK, N. Y. 



WBAI 



Page 1 1 



Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750): 
"Hunting" Cantata (Helen Donath, Elisa- 
beth Speiser, sopranos; Wilfrid Jochims, 
tenor; Jakob Stampfli. bass; Chorus of the 
Gediichtniskirche; Chamber Ensemble of 
the Bach Collegium, Stuttgart; Helmuth 
Rilling, dir.) (Nonesuch H-71147) 39m. 
(August 18) 
10:15 COMMENTARY with Thomas Fran- 
cis Ritt. (August 11) 
10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 

Julty. (August 12) 
10:45 TAKING STOCK OF WALL 
STREET with William Kent. (August 12) 
11:15 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING: The 
upcoming programs described by Mike 
Hodel. (August 13) 
11:30 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The 
ninth part of the serialization of John 
Wyndham's novel read by Bill Cavness. 
12:00 MUSIC FROM THE RYUKYU 
ISLANDS part 1: The first part of a three 
program series. (KPFA) (August 10) 
12:30 MISCELLANY 
12:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re 

broadcast of the August 1 1 report. 
1:45 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 

BURN: Book reviews. (August 13) 
2:00 FROM THE MIDWAY #1171: Edwin 
O. Reichauer, University Professor at Har- 
vard and former United States Ambassa- 
dor to Japan, discusses Japan's role in the 
modern world. 
3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY: Elizabeth Van- 

dermei's August 9th program repeated. 
4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 

See page 21. 
5:00 SIXTEENTH CENTURY MUSIC: 
by Lechner. Sweelinck and de Manchi- 
court. For details see August 4 morning 
concert. 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 
6:45 COMMENTARY with Conrad Lynn, 

civil liberties lawyer. (August 15) 
7:00 CHRISTIANITY IN CRISIS with Rob- 
ert Ortiz who reports on the latest devel- 
opments in the religious world. (August 15) 
7:15 MUSIC BY LUCIA DLUGOSZEWSKI: 
-^CEarly Floating 

Dazzle on a Knife's Edge 
Lords of Persia 
Cantilever. 
(August 18) 
8:30 THE SEARCH FOR SURVIVAL #2: 
-fCOh Make it Mean Something: A survey of 
the culture and history of the Hopi Indians 
of Arizona, including field recordings with 
leaders and spokesmen. Written and pro- 
duced by Philip Austin. (KPFK) (August 
18) 
9:30 FROM THE CENTER FOR THE 
STUDY OF DEMOCRATIC INSTITU- 
TIONS #259: Operation Bootstrap #3— 
The U.S. Constitution or Self-Determina- 
tion for Negroes: Does the Constitution 
need revising to protect minority groups, 
or must Negroes choose to fight for inde- 
pendent nationhood? Excerpts from a dis- 
cussion with delegates from Operation 
Bootstrap and staff members of the Center 
for the Study of Democratic Institutions. 
(August 17) 



10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: A daily report of 
the Vietnam situation by Paul Schaffer. 
(August 15) 

11:00 THE MOVIES: Teen-agers Make 
Movies: Bob Sitton talks with Rodger Lar- 
son about the several projects he has con- 
ducted in film-making among New York 
teen-agers. The projects disprove the no- 
tion that making films is both difficult (or 
impossible) for young people and pro- 
hibitively expensive. The Larson films are 
created in their entirety by the students. 
(August 19) 

11:30 OTIS "DOC" MARSTON'S GRAND 
CANYON: Doc Marston, Grand Canyon 
pioneer talks with Karl Schwenke and 
Colin Fletcher about his life and wander- 
ings in the great gorge. (KPFA) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Tonight, 
Bob's guests will be Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
Krishner of Flushing. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 15 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry Joseph- 
son does the mourning show. 
9:00 MUSIC BY FRANZ SCHUBERT 

(1799-1828): 

String Quartet No. 9 in G Minor (Endres 
Quartet) (Vox VBX) 24m.; The Death of 
Lazarus (Religious Drama in One Act) 
(Helmut Kretschmer. Ingeborg Reichelt, 
Rico Mente, Use Siekbach, Barbara Trox- 
ell, vocal soloists; NDR Chorus; Philhar- 
monia Orchestra of Hamburg; Arthur 
Winograd. cond.) (MGM E3526) 50m. 
(August 21) 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 14) 

10:30 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn. 
(August 14) 

10:45 CHRISTIANITY IN CRISIS with 
Robert Ortiz, WBAI's Religion Editor. 
(August 14) 

11:00 COLLECTORS AND COLLECTING 
#3: James Johnson Sweeney, director of 
the Houston Museum of Fine Art and 
former Director of The Guggenheim Mu- 
seum, talks about the role of the museum 
in shaping public opinion. Produced by 
Rose Mary Anderson. (July 16) 

12:15 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #73 with Gunther Schuller. For 
details see August 9. 

1:15 MISCELLANY 

1:30 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The 
tenth in the series of Bill Cavness' readings 
from John Wyndham's novel. 

2:00 THE CHALLENGE OF OUR TIME 
#1: A rebroadcast of Arnold Toynbee's 
lecture. (August 8) 

3:00 NEGRO MUSIC with Charles Hob- 
son. (August 12) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 MUSIC BY HEINRICH VON BIBER 
(1644-1704): 



Battalia (Angelicum Orchestra of Milan; 
Newell Jenkins, cond.) (Nonesuch H- 
71 146) 9m ; Balletti Lamentabili; Sonata X 
(Christ on the Cross), from the "Mystery 
Sonatas;" Mensa Sonora, Part I (Concentus 
Musicus Renaissance and Baroque Music 
Ensemble) (Bach Guild BG-652) 25m.; 
Sonata a 6 for Trumpet and Strings (Roger 
Voisin. trumpet: Orchestra directed by 
Kenneth Schermerhorn) (Kapp 9033) 6m.; 
Sonatas IV, V, and VI from the "Mystery 
Sonatas" (Sonya Monosoff, violin; Melville 
Smith, organ and harpsichord; James 
Scholz, viola da gamba; John Miller, bas- 
soon) (Cambridge CRM 811) 24m.; Con- 
certo in C for Trumpet, strings and basso 
continuo (Heinz Zickler, trumpet; Wurt- 
temberg Chamber Orchestra, Heilbronn; 
Jorg Faerber, cond.) (Turnabout TV 
34090S) 5m.; Sonata in B Flat for 6 trum- 
pets, timpani and organ (I Solisti di Zagreb; 
Helmut Wobisch, cond.) (Bach Guild BG- 
641) 3m. (August 29) 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 
6:45 COMMENTARY by a speaker to be 

announced. (August 16) 
7:00 THE CONDITION OF JEWISH BE- 
-7CLIEF #2: Distinguished Rabbis and theo- 
logians tell of their beliefs. In this program 
Rabbi Jaakov Jacobs, editor of the Jewish 
Observer (Orthodox) speaks. (August 18) 
7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . BERT 
WHEELER? From their dozens of feature 
films in the '30s and appearances in Broad- 
way shows, Wheeler and Woolsey are one 
of the best remembered comedy teams in 
Show Business. The star of such hits as 
Rio Rita and Girl Crazy reminisces with 
Richard Lamparski about his late partners, 
Fanny Brice and Flo Ziegfield. (August 16) 
8:00 COMPUTER MUSIC: Two composi- 
tions produced with a computer, at the 
University of Illinois: 

Lejaren Hiller and Leonard Issacson: Illiac 
Suite for String Quartet (1957) (University 
of Illinois Composition String Quartet) 
18m. 

Lejaren Hiller and Robert Baker: Com- 
puter Cantata (1963) (Helen Hamm, so- 
prano; Contemporary Chamber Players of 
the University of Illinois; Jack McKenzie, 
cond.) 23m. (Heliodor HS 25053) (August 
23) 

8:45 WHERE HELEN LIES: by James 
Broughton: The play was directed by Ker- 
mit Sheets and produced for radio by Erik 
Bauersfeld with technical production by 
Warren van Orden. Cast: The Woman, 
Jane Steckle; The Man, Kermit Sheets. 
(KPFA) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A time 
slot left open for a program of current in- 
terest. Details will be given on WBAI's 
A Look at the Listening on Sunday eve- 
nings. (August 16) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY: Paul Schaffer's 
report on the Vietnam situation. A daily 
report. (August 16) 

11:00 SONIA MALKINE: Troubador Songs 
from Then and Now. (August 16) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE with Bob 
Fass — everybody loves a lover. 



Page 12 



WBAI 



PREVIEW FROM THE DRAMA 
AND LITERATURE DEPARTMENT 

WBAI's 99.5 Radio Theatre has managed to maintain 
its existence since December, and even to accomplish about 
a production a month, primarily due to the contributions 
of time and talent made by the many actors and directors 
and technicians that have worked with us. Though mail 
response has been disappointingly small (both positive and 
negative) we are going to continue to try our best to revive 
radio drama as a living medium. We have several good 
scripts on hand, and are slowly developing a company of 
able and willing actors that enjoy and believe in the work 
we are doing. Our major lack is still directors; we have 
several talented people on tap, but naturally, they prefer 
to work on material they have chosen themselves. What 
we need is a director who would like to tackle the scripts 
that we have. 

Be that as it may, the major energies of the department 
have been devoted over the summer to an historical epic . . . 
WBAI's Ben Hur, you might say, but with a great differ- 
ence. Christopher Morley has been out of fashion for some 
time; if anything, he is remembered for Kitty Foyle. But 
in 1936, he published a novel about the Trojan War which 
was an adaptation of the Troilus and Cressida legend. It 
was odd on several counts. First because it was written in 
a form that seemed to jump arbitrarily from narrative to 
script; only a few people detected that it seemed to have 
been written for radio. Secondly, it was a very modern 
look at the whole thing; Cressida is a debutante, Pandarus 
a financier, Cassandra the leader of the Peace Movement, 
and much of the action of the war is recounted over the 
Trojan Broadcasting System, The Voice of Ilium. The use 
of anachronism is very similar to T. H. White's The Once 
and Future King, and another comparison that can be made 
is to The Trojan War Will Not Take Place (Tiger at the 
Gates) of Giraudoux. 

The 99.5 Radio Theatre is producing. the work in its 
entirety, in the radio equivalent of a staged reading. It's 
taking us all summer and employs (we use the term loosely, 
since no one is getting paid) a cast of about twenty five. 
The running time on completion will be about four hours, 
an epic indeed for WBAI. Cliff May, who has worked for 
us before, will be playing Troilus, and Judith Seto will make 
her WBAI debut as Cressida. Other members of the cast 
who may be familiar to WBAI listeners are Kathleen Dal- 
ton, who plays Hecuba, Mike Hodel, who takes on the task 
of reporting on the action for the Voice of Ilium, (who 
says we type cast?) plus several character parts, and Ann- 
ette Oliver, from Next Time I'll Sing to You and The Skills 
of Xanadu, who is doing a travesto role as Sarpedoni, the 
owner of a road house down by the Hellespont. 

The work is very funny on the surface, and very '30s; 
but underneath, tragic and extremely timely. As Mr. Morley 
says, in the very first sentence, "It is Earth's most famous 
town, so it belongs to everybody, and to all times at once." 
We hope that many WBAI listeners will spend an evening 
at home in October to listen to The Trojan Horse, and will 
tell us what they think when they have heard it. 

Baird Searles, Director, Drama/ Lit. 

FROM THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Who can deny that radio is a great medium for listening 
to music! Radio has the unique, marvelous facility for pre- 
senting the full range — to make universal concert halls at 
home. And for music, there are still new, untried possibili- 
ties in broadcasting. 

Right now our aims in the matter boil down to this: 
We try to air music of the different directions in compo- 
sition today; pre-renaissance music (with its connections to 
contemporary music); music from other cultures than our 



own; jazz idioms; folk music; and seldom heard good music 
literature from all periods of history. We try to treat the 
many parts of music as a whole, and by diversified pro- 
gramming, redefine music ... for isn't music absolutely 
dead if not redefined continually by our experience? So we 
are apt to schedule for morning concert series, a program 
of Di Lasso, followed by one by Mahler, then a percussion 
program, Gregorian Chants, String Quartets, Vittoria, Cage, 
Machaut, Varese, and so on. At first glance this may seem 
a frightful mish-mash, but after listening, we hope it does 
not! 

What about talk on music? Pre-digested fares of analysis 
are not wanted; at the same time talk by composers, per- 
formers, and essays on music (Webern, Busoni, etc.) are 
important. 

Social aspects of music present other topics for radio. 
Change in our rip-roaring time provokes conflicts, confu- 
sions — even for music — and I feel that radio should try 
to clarify them or at least point them out. Background music 
is an example subject. Let's go into it for a minute. Here 
is a comment of a listener, who happens to be thirteen years 
old: "Talk by composers, together with their music and all 
that keeps listeners from using WBAI for background mu- 
sic!" My comment is "Fine!" But background music exists 
all the way from canned sound for elevators, banks, lobbies, 
and restaurants, to music played on radios or phonographs 
by people while they work (housework, painting, mathe- 
matics, etc.). And there was a time when the Guggenheim 
Museum played Bach recordings as a backdrop for their 
collection. This and other social interactions with music are 
fertile subjects for radio discussion or reference. 

But so much for the philosophy behind our WBAI music 
programming. 

What does our musical future look like? 

First we intend to continue to build a good library for 
broadcasts. Rare ethnic music of quality is an immediate 
aim. However, the emergence of a real "Library" depends 
a great deal on the future of WBAI. An effective radio 
library must have better dubbing and technical facilities 
than we now have at the station . . . not to mention needed 
space for organization. But it seems we have reason for 
being optimistic! Our listeners, a most remarkable group 
of people, are helping, and we hope they will be caught 
up still more by the urgency of our needs, so that we can 
do a better job. Also, the hard work of volunteers in the 
music office, on recording remotes, and for dubbing, is of 
huge help. (We can only take a few of those who offer 
their time, because of no space, typewriters, etc. etc.) I'd 
like to mention here that assistant director, Rory Butler, 
has added a great deal to our programming. 

As for the immediate broadcast future of next season: 
We have coming up Soviet Music — 7967. It consists of a 
talk by Elliot Carter followed by a round table discussion 
and a concert of music recently discovered in Russia. Mr. 
Joel Spiegelman of the Sarah Lawrence College faculty 
found it during a study period in the U.S.S.R. It is music 
only very recently allowed to be heard in Russia, new music, 
and of great interest. 

Among the composers to be heard with the presentation 
of their music are Aaron Copland, Jacob Avshalomov, 
Peter Phillips, Alcides Lanza and Luciano Berio. Along with 
many good folk and jazz programs, Elizabeth Vandermei 
will be returning from Europe with more Sounds of Today, 
and we will have a new folk music program with Tracy 
McNamara. 

We expect an arrival of tapes any minute now from the 
summer Music Festival of Mexico, and this month we are 
taping portions from sessions of the Collegium of Early 
Music, being held in Putney, Vermont. 

We keep fingers crossed for a good music year ahead. 
Ann McMillan, Director of the Music Department 



WBAI 



Page 13 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 16 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Hatred is ram- 
pant. 

9:00 MUSIC OF THE EIGHTEENTH 
CENTURY: 

Frantisek Xaver Dusek (1731-1799): Par- 
thia in F for two oboes, two horns and bas- 
soons 6m.; Josef Fiala (1748-1816): Parthia 
in D Sharp for two English horns, two 
French horns and bassoon 7m.; Leopold 
Koseluh ( 1 747- 1818): Notturnos for Voices, 
Op. 42 11m.; Frantisek Antoni Rossler (c. 
1750-1792): Notturno in D for flute, violin, 
viola, cello and two horns 11m.; (Czech 
Philharmonic Chorus; Musici Pragenses, 
Linor Hlavace. dir.; Members of the 
Prague Chamber Harmony, Libor Pesek, 
dir.) (Crossroads 22 16 0065) Pierre 
Vachen (1731-1802): String Quartet in F 
Minor, Op. 11, No. 5; 19m.; Nicholas 
d'Alararac (1753-1809): String Quartet in 
D Major, Op. 7, No. 3 10m.; (Loewenguth 
Quartet) (Archive ARC 3149) 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): 
Adagio, K. 44(ld for two basset horns and 
bassoon; Two Notturni for voices and 
winds: Eece quel fiero istante, and Due 
pupille amabilli (Margot Guilleaume, so- 
prano; Jeanne Deroubaix, mezzo-soprano; 
Hans-Olaf Hudemann, bass; Rudolf Irm- 
isch, Hans Helmke, Karl Peppier, basset 
horns: Albert Hennige. bassoon) (Archive 
ARC 3121) 5m. (August 22) 
10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 

(August 15) 
10:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF... BERT 
WHEELER? Richard Lamparski inter- 
views. (August 15) 
11:00 COMMENTARY with a speaker to 

be announced. (August 15) 
11:15 KAREL PACHTA, piano teacher, 
speaks about the teaching of music. The 
third in a series of five programs. 
11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The 
eleventh episode in the serialization of 
John Wyndham's novel read by Bill Cav- 
ness. 
12:30 MARTHA GRAHAM: Her Contribu- 
tion to Contemporary Dance (1966) Pro- 
duced by Ann McMillan. (August 7) 
2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: For de- 
tails see August 15. 
3:00 SONIA MALKINE with the beautiful 

folk songs of France. (August 15) 
4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 

See page 21. 
5:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION— #74: 

Gunther Schuller continues his series with 
music from the year 1930: 
Igor Stravinsky: Symphony of Psalms 
Aaron Copland: Piano Variations 
Silvestre Revueltas: Cuahnahuac 
(August 22) 
6:00 READINGS FROM RENE CHAR: 
Robert Blossom reads from his own trans- 
lations of the poet, from the WBAI ar- 
chives. 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 
6:45 COMMENTARY with Allard K. Low- 



enstein, author of the Brutal Mandate. 
(August 17) 

7:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sarris, 
film critic for the Village Voice. (August 
18) 

7:30 A REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel, author of Russia 
Revisited. (KPFA) (August 17) 

7:45 THE LATE EDGARD VARESE: 
"^Interviewed by Eric Salzman, with a post- 
script by Eric Salzman with Ann McMil- 
lan. (From the WBAI Archives) 

9:15 KNOWLEDGE WITHOUT WALLS 
#2: A series of lectures and discussion 
programs by faculty members of San Fran- 
cisco State College devoted to re-thinking 
academic disciplines in response to con- 
temporary experience. In this talk Dr. 
Stanley Anderson, professor of Humani- 
ties, discusses Space for the Humanities. 
Recorded March 14, 1967. (KPFA) 

10:00 JAZZ AT HOME with Chris Albert- 
son and occasional guests. 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 17) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY with Elizabeth 
Vandermei, who brings us New Music and 
modern jazz. (August 21) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE with Bob 
the F. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 17 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: More drek and 
slime — in Laricolor and Josevision. 

9:00 FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH 
CENTURY MUSIC: 

A program of works by Barbireau (d. 
1491), Binchois (c. 1400-1460), Busnois 
(d. 1492), Compere (1450-1518). Costeley 
(c. 1531-1606). Delahaye, Dufaye (1400- 
1474), Le Jeune (c. 1530-c. 1600), Lasso 
(1532-1594), Passereau (fl. c. 1509) and 
anonymous works (Abbey Singers — Decca 
DL 10073; Riverside Chamber Singers — 
Music Guild MG-107; Saturday Consort 
—Classic Editions CE 1037; Vocal and 
instrumental ensemble — Nonesuch H- 
71010; Pro Musica Antiqua. Brussels — 
Safford Cape, dir. — Archive ARC 3003) 
71m. (August 29) 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 16) 

10:30 COMMENTARY with Allard K. Low- 
enstein. (August 16) 

10:45 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel, author of Russia 
Revisited. (August 16) 

11:00 FROM THE CENTER FOR DEMO- 
CRATIC INSTITUTIONS #259: Opera- 
tion Bootstrap: For details of this program 
see August 14th listings. 

12:00 COMMENTARY by a speaker from 
the Socialist Labor Party. (August 13) 

12:15 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The 
twelfth episode in the serialization of John 
Wyndham's novel. Read by Bill Cavness. 

12:45 THE WARFARE BETWEEN THE 
INTELLECTUALS AND THE MASS 
MEDIA #12: Byron Bryant continues his 
series. (August 1 1) 

1:15 IGOR STRAVINSKY: 

Mass (1948) (Gregg Smith Singers; mem- 



bers of the Columbia Symphony; Igor Stra- 
vinsky, cond.) 17m.; In Memoriam Dylan 
Thomas (1954) (Alexander Young, tenor; 
Columbia Chamber Ensemble; Igor Stra- 
vinsky, cond.) 8m. (Columbia MS 6992) 
(August 28) 
1:45 CHANGES: Alan Watts introduces 
Leary, Snyder and Ginsberg for a discus- 
sion on LSD and so forth. (KPFA) (Au- 
gust 10) 
3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Don 
Schlitten, jazz man par excellence. (August 
13) 
4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 

See page 21. 
5:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #50: Selec- 
tions, mostly musical, from Puntila, with 
music by Paul Dessau, and Trumpets and 
Drums with music by Wagner-Regency. 
(August 12) 
6:00 PROPOSAL FOR AN UNUSUAL 
LAW TO TRICK CONSERVATIVES 
INTO CONSERVING MANKIND: A 
talk from the 1962 WBAI Archives by 
Auro Roselli. 
6:15 MISCELLANY 
6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 
6:45 REPORT TO THE LISTENER: Sta- 
tion Manager, Frank Millspaugh tells the 
world about the state of WBAI. (August 
20) 
7:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 
Announcements made by Frank Mills- 
paugh about events open to the general 
public, sponsored by various civic and 
non-profit organizations. Produced by 
Susan Crayne. (August 18) 
7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES: 
Baird Searles surveys the fields of science 
fiction and fantasy bi-weekly both in the 
printed word (books and magazines) and 
the Performing Arts. (August 20). 
7:30 THE MOVIES: A DURABLE STAR. 
"T^Bob Sitton has captured Joan Crawford 
for WBAI's Drama and Literature Dept. 
in a discussion of her career in motion 
pictures, her marriages to Douglas Fair- 
banks Jr. and to Franchot Tone, miniskirts, 
and television. (August 23) 
8:30 MUSIC NOT FOR EXPORT: Music 
-^Cfrom the Satellites, Part 2: Czechoslovakia 
Jan Klusak: Pictures for 12 Wind Instru- 
ments 

Pavel Blatney: Suite for Wind Instruments 
and Piano 

Jarmilla Kozderkova, Piano; Chamber 
Ensemble of Wind Instruments/Liber 
Pesek 

Sdenek Pololanik: Musica Spingenta III. 
Josef Horak, bass clarinet; Pavel Stanek, 
percussion. 

J. Rychlik: African Cycle I. V Musica Viva 
Pragensis (Supraphon SUA 18595) (Au- 
gust 24) 
9:30 TALK-BACK: A live discussion on 
current events, followed by a period dur- 
ing which listeners may ask questions of 
the participants by calling OX 7-8506. 
Produced by Andy McGowan. 
10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 
10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
a daily review of the Vietnam situation. 
(August 18) 
11:00 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. 
with WBAI's U.N. correspondent, Betty 
Pilkington. (August 18) 



Page 14 



WBAI 



11:30 MUSIC FROM THE RYUKYU 
-^ISLANDS: Part 2: Robert Garfias. Profes- 
sor of Music at the University of Washing- 
ton, continues his presentation of music 
from these Islands. (August 21) 
12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass 
kills 2 multicolored rainbow roaches, and 
one rather drab volunteer. 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 18 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry eats his 

way to your heart. 
9:00 MUSIC BY SERGE PROKOFIEF 

(1891-1953): 

Suite from 'The Prodigal Son' (L'Orches- 
tra des Concerts Colonne; George Sebas- 
tian, cond.) (Urania URLP 7139) 18m.; 
Suite from 'Le Pas d'Acier' (Moscow Radio 
Symphony Orchestra; Gennady Rozhdest- 
vensky, cond.) 14m.; Oratorio: On Guard 
for Peace, Op. 124 (Zara Dolukhanova, 
mezzo-soprano; E. Talanov. alto; Com- 
bined Choirs and State Orchestra of the 
USSR; Samuel Samessoud, cond.) (Van- 
guard VRS — now out of print) 38m. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 17) 

10:30 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. 
with Betty Pilkington. (August 17) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sar- 
ds. (August 16) 

11:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 
Announcements read by Frank Millspaugh. 
(August 17) 

11:45 THE HORROR FILM: for details of 
this program, see August 1 1 listings. 

12:30 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The 
thirteenth episode of John Wyndham's seri- 
alized novel. (Read by Bill Cavness) 

1:00 MUSIC BY LUCIA DLUGOZEWSKI: 
For details of her program, see August 14 
listing. 

2:15 THE CONDITIONS OF JEWISH BE- 
LIEFS #2: Today's contributor is Rabbi 
Jaakov Jacobs. (August 15) 

2:45 MISCELLANY 

3:00 THE SEARCH FOR SURVIVAL #2: 
A rebroadcast of the August 14 program. 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 MUSIC BY VIVALDI AND BACH: 
For details of this program see August 14 
listings. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 SPECIAL REPORT: Compiled by the 
Public Affairs Department with the per- 
sonal assistance of the News Director. 
(August 19) 

7:15 COMMENTARY with Thomas Fran- 
cis Ritt who has been described as one of 
the NEW BREED of American Catholic. 
(August 21) 

7:30 ACTUALITE par Theo Loir. (August 
19) 

7:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A pro- 
gram of timely importance. (August 21) 

8^0 MUSIC NOT FOR EXPORT— Music 

"TMrom the Satellites, part 1, Bulgaria: 
Ljubov Piplov: Symphony (Sofia State 
Philharmonic Orchestra/Konstantin Hiev) 
(Supraphon SUA 10419) 



Krasimir Kiurkchiyzky: String Quartet. 
(The Dimov Quartet) (Balkanton BKA 
421) (August 25) 
10:00 WARFARE BETWEEN THE INTEL- 
LECTUALS AND THE MASS MEDIA 
#13: Byron Bryant concludes his series 
with The Present Dilemma of Television. 
(KPFA) (August 25) 
10:30 NEWS with Mike Hodel. 
10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
who compiles a report from dispatches 
from Hanoi. (August 19) 
11:00 INTERFAITH MARRIAGE: Father 
Alan McCoy, president of the Canon Law 
Society of America, and Father Richard 
Byfield, rector of All-Saints Episcopal 
Church in Palo Alto, discuss with Elsa 
Knight Thompson, interfaith marriage and 
other aspects of cooperation among the 
Christian churches. (KPFA) 
12:00 THE RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob 
Fass analyzes some affairs usually ignored 
by the mass media. 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 19 



8:00 NINETEENTH CENTURY PIANO 
MUSIC: 

Gioacchino Rossini (1792-1868); Selec- 
tions from 'Sins of My Old Age': Tarantelle 
Pur Sang; Prelude Pretentieux; Momento 
Homo; Assez De Memento; Dansons (Luci- 
ano Sgrizzi, piano) (Nonesuch H71163) 
24m. 

Robert Schumann (1810-1856): David- 
biindlertanze (Rudolf Firkusny, piano) 
(Capitol P 8337) 31m. 
Franz Schubert (1797-1828): Sonata in B 
flat, Op. Posth. (Vladimir Horowitz, piano) 
(Victor LM-6014) 32m. 

9:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 18) 

10:45 SPECIAL REPORT: See August 18 
listings for details. 

11:15 ACTUALITE par Theo Loir. (August 
18) 

11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC with WBAFs 
Chief Engineer, Tom Whitmore. (August 
13) 

12:00 THE MOVIES: Teen-Agers Make 
Movies: Bob Sitton talks with Rodger Lar- 
son and finds that film-making may not 
be as expensive as all that. (August 14) 

12:30 COMMUNITY ORGANIZERS: A 
student panel discussion at the Agri-Labor 
conference at Boalt Hall on the Berkeley 
Campus, University of California, April 1,- 
1967. Panelists were Ellen Weisman, a 
Vista Appalachian volunteer; Hardy Frye 
of SNCC. SDS, and the Mississippi Free- 
dom Labor Union; Bob Lawson of JOIN 
and SDS; and James Goodwin of Bay 
Area Neghborhood Development. Mike 
Kelley was the Moderator. (KPFA) 

2:00 JAZZ with Joel Lee Wilson. 

4:00 THE REV. MARTIN DUFFY: The 
Westchester County Minister recently re- 
ceived a vote of confidence from his con- 
gregation after some members had accused 
him of foresaking his clerical duties for 
peace and civil rights activities. In this in- 



terview with WBAI volunteer Martin Kroll, 
Rev. Duffy talks about himself and the 
charges. 

5:00 MUSIC BY ALESSANDRO SCAR- 
LATTI (1660-1725): 

Cantata: Infirmata Vulnerata (Dietrich 
Fischer-Dieskau, baritone; Aurele Nicolet, 
flute: Helmut Heller, violin; Edith Picht- 
Axenfeld. harpsichord; Irmgard Poppen, 
cello) (Angel S 36237) 14m.; Concerto No. 
6 in F Major for strings (Virtuosi di Roma; 
Renato Fasano, dir.) (Decca DL 9572) 8m.; 
Stabat Mater (Rosanna Giancola. soprano; 
Miti Truccato-Pace, contralto; Orchestra 
of the Scuola Venziana; Angelo Ephrikian, 
cond.) (Vox PL 7970) 48m. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Chuck Lindholm. 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 
Julty. (August 21) 

7:15 TAKING STOCK OF WALL STREET: 
William Kent of the brokerage firm of 
Philips, Appel and Walden, does a sum- 
mary of the stock market reviews and 
tweaks a few noses in the process. (August 
21) 

7:30 ROBERT GRAVES READS FROM 

->CHIS POETRY AND FROM "THE 
WHITE GODDESS:" The voice of Rob- 
ert Graves on recording. (Caedmon TC 
1066) (August 25) 

8:45 MUSIC FROM NORTHERN JAPAN: 

^CTaiko Itabashi talks about the folk music 
of her native region with Diana Beirne. 
Illustrated with recordings of outstanding 
folk singers and musicians. (August 11) 

9:30 MARSHALL WINDMILLER RE- 

"?f PORTS #2: Pacifica commentator Mar- 
shall Windmiller reports from London. In 
this second program he interviews Loren 
Clarke, Secretary of the British Council 
for Peace in Vietnam. (August 27) 

10:00 NEGRO MUSIC: Charles Hobson 
brings us R&R, R&B, blues, gospel, calypso 
or guest musicians and musicologists. 
(August 22) 

11:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #1: The 
original Bentley on Brecht Album with 
Bentley reading and singing. (Folkways FH 
5434) by permission. (August 24) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE with Steve Post. For 
details, see page 21. 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 20 



8:00 GUSTAV MAHLER: 

Symphony No. 2 in C Minor ( "Resurrec- 
tion"): (Jeannie Tourel, mezzo-soprano; 
Lee Venora, soprano; Collegiate Chorale; 
New York Philharmonic; Leonard Bern- 
stein, cond.) 85m. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES: The continuing series from WBAFs 
archives with the late Dr. Henry Cowell. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher 
with operatic recordings of the past. 
(KPFA) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER with 
Frank Millspaugh, WBAFs Station Man- 
ager. (August 17) 

10:45 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES 
with Baird Searles. (August 17) 

11:00 URBAN APPALACHIA— The Ten- 



WBAI 



Page 15 



derloin: An interview with Deaconess 
Phyllis Edwards of the Episcopal Church 
in San Francisco. Deaconess Edwards has 
worked in the San Francisco poverty areas, 
primarily the Tenderloin and Mission dis- 
tricts, for several years, and fought to 
establish the fifth target area of central 
city poverty program. She is currently 
Chairman of the Area Poverty Board. The 
interviewer is Al Silbowitz. (KPFA) 

12:00 MARTIN LUTHER KING AT 
STANFORD: Dr. King addressing the stu- 
dent body. (KPFK) 

1:00 MISCELLANY 

1:15 GUERNICA AS HISTORY PAINT- 
ING: Art historian Joe Mashek discusses 
the Picasso painting from a modern critic's 
viewpoint. Mr. Mashek is a Ph.D. candi- 
date at Columbia University and was also 
president of the Art History graduate stu- 
dents at the university. In this talk, he tries 
to place Guernica within its proper per- 
spective. 

1:45 NASSER RASTEGAR-NEJAD plays 

-^Cand sings music in the ancient Persian tra- 
dition. A concert held at Asia House in 
New York City, of the Society for Asian 
Music, October, 1966. (From the WBAI 
archives) (August 23) 

3:00 THE TET VIGIL: Two participants in 

-^Cthe Tet fast and vigil in San Francisco's 
Grace Cathedral, Professor Frederick C. 
Crews of the English Dept., U.C. at 
Berkeley, and Professor Carl Schorake of 
the History Dept. talk about the Vietnam 
war with Lou Hartman, KPFA's News Di- 
rector. (KPFA) (August 29) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY: the best of Radio 
Unnameable with Bob Fass. 

5:00 THE YOUNG REVOLUTION— Cuba 
Today: An interview with Mrs. Mauricle 
Hussey, who has just returned from a 2V4 
month trip to Cuba. Mrs. Hussey is a Brit- 
ish citizen who has travelled in the past 
to the Soviet Union, and to the People's 
Republic of China. The interviewer is Al 
Silbowitz. (KPFA) 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC with Tom Whit- 
more. (August 26) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Harry Goodman. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with a speaker from 
the Socialist Labor Party. (August 24) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN: Book reviews by a variety of 
critics. (August 21) 

7:15 RENDEZVOUS: Varietes francaises a 
New York; spectacles, arts, lettres, et idees 
a l'ordre du jour. Une emission realisee 
avec le concours des Services Culturels 
francais, et presentee en francais par 
Odette de la Tour et Jean-Louis de 
Turenne. 

8:15 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE: A multiple 
criticism of current events in the arts of 
dance, film, theatre, music, painting, and 
literature which are reviewed specifically 
and then discussed generally by the per- 
sonnel. They vary, but will probably be, in 
this edition: Deborah Jowitt (dance), Mur- 
ray Ralph (music), Cal Green (film), Mar- 
tin Last (literature), Bill Epton (art and 
architecture), Rose Mary Anderson (the- 
atre) and Baird Searles, who produces and 
moderates. The production assistant is 
Judy Green. (August 24) 



9:30 MUSIC BY AARON AND JACOB 
AVSHALOMOV: See details August 2 

10:15 GERMAN POETRY: Alfred Roth- 
schild reads a personal selection of German 
poetry, both in the original and in trans- 
lation. Mr. Rothschild is the originator and 
chief editor of the New Bantam Edition of 
Shakespeare's Plays; his other program for 
WBAI is Shakespeare with a Difference. 
(August 29) 

10:45 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING with 
Mike Hodel. (August 21) 

11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Ira Git- 
ler. (August 24) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE: Steve Post turned up 
in the barter box filed under miscellaneous 
goods. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 21 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING with Swami 
Lhakadanta Boghitastani Schwartz. 

9:00 TWENTIETH CENTURY CON- 
CERTOS: 

Darius Milhaud: Cello Concerto No. 1 
(Janos Starker, cello; Philharmonia Or- 
chestra; Walter Susskind, cond.) (Angel 
35418) 13m. 

Igor Stravinsky: Concerto for Piano and 
Winds (Carl Seemann, piano; Berlin Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; Thomas Scherman, 
cond.) (Decca DL 9963) 18m. 
Bela Bartok: Concerto for Viola and Or- 
chestra (William Primrose, viola; New 
Symphony Orchestra of London; Tibor 
Serly, cond.) (Bartok 309) 21m. 
Serge Prokofiev: Concerto No. 1 in D Flat 
Major for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 10 
(Gary Graffman, piano; Cleveland Orches- 
tra; George Szell, cond.) (Columbia MS 
6925) 15m. (August 28) 

10:15 COMMENTARY by Thomas F. Ritt. 
(August 18) 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 
Julty. (August 19) 

11:00 TAKING STOCK OF WALL 
STREET with William Kent. (August 19) 

11:30 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING with 
Mike Hodel. (August 20) 

11:45 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The 
fourteenth in a series of 18 readings of 
John Wyndham's classic science fiction 
novel. (WGBH) 

12:15 MUSIC FROM THE RYUKYU 
ISLANDS, PART 2: See August 17. 

12:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re- 
port of timely interest. (August 18) 

1:45 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW, OR 
BURN: A review. (August 20) 

2:00 FROM THE MIDWAY #1172: Charles 
Lucet, French Ambassador to the United 
States talks on France and World Prob- 
lems; and, Torlov Kandah, Editor in Chief 
of Oslo's Aftenposten, Norway's most 
widely distributed newspaper, talks on 
Norway's Role in World Affairs. 

3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY: Modern jazz 
presented by Elizabeth Vandermei. (Au- 
gust 16) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 



5:00 MUSIC BY FRANZ SCHUBERT: See 

details August 15. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn, 
longtime leftist and civil liberties lawyer. 
(August 22) 

7:00 THE GREAT VICTOREE: A WBAI 
Archive program from 1964 which "cov- 
ers" Goldwater's N. Y. victory rally held 
a week before the election. 

7:15 MORTON FELDMAN: Music and 
talk by the modern composer. (August 28) 

8:30 SEARCH FOR SURVIVAL #3: Squat- 

"TCter's Wrongs: An up-to-the-minute docu- 
mentary on the Indians' current political 
situation, produced from field recordings 
made in the states of California, Washing- 
ton and Arizona, by David Ossman, 
Michail Dayton, and Peter Bergman. 
(KPFK) (August 27) 

9:30 ARTS EXTRA: A time period held 
open for programs from the Drama and 
Literature Department of immediate in- 
terest. (August 24) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 22) 

11:00 LIEBESLIEDER WALZER: Johannes 
Brahms: Liebeslieder Walzer, Op. 52 
(Benita Valente, soprano; Marlena Klein- 
man, alto; Wayne Connor, tenor; Martial 
Singher, bass; Rudolf Serkin, Leon Fleish- 
er, piano) (Columbia ML 5636) 26m.; 
Neue Liebeslieder Walzer, Op. 65 (Irmgard 
Seefried, soprano; Raili Kostia, alto; Wal- 
demar Kmentt, tenor; Eberhard Waechter, 
baritone; Erik Werba, Gunther Weissen- 
born, piano) (Deutsche Grammophon 
LPM 18792) 19m. 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass 
may turn a night into a day — but let's see 
him turn a day into a Knight! 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 22 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry Joseph- 
son examines a bagel and finds it unhole- 
some. The plot thickens. 

9:00 ITALIAN MADRIGALS: 

Featuring works by Philippe de Monte 
(1521-1603), and including works by Ma- 
renzio, Monteverdi. Rore, Gesualdo, Arca- 
delt, Wert, Verdelot, Willaert, Luzzaschi, 
and Andrea Gabrieli. (Deller Consort; Al- 
fred Deller, dir. — Bach Guild BG-639; 
Abbey Singers — Decca DL 710103; Nuovo 
Madrigaletto Italiano: Emilio Giani, dir. — 
Nonesuch H-71021; Prague Madrigal 
Choir: Miroslav Venhoda, dir., with Mu- 
sica Antiqua, Wien: Rene Clemencic. dir. 
—Bach Guild BGS-70655) 73m. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 21) 

10:30 COMMENTARY by Conrad Lynn. 
(August 21) 

10:45 COLLECTORS AND COLLECTING 
#4: Peregrine Pollen: A repeat of our 
Sunday afternoon series. In this program. 
Peregrine Pollen, President of Parke-Ber- 
net, talks on International Auction Houses 
and Collecting. 



Page 16 



WBAI 



12:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #74 with Gunther Schuller. 
(August 16) 

1:00 THE MIDYVICH CUCKOOS: The fif- 
teenth reading in a series of 18 of John 
Wyndham's science fiction novel from 
which the film. Village of the Damned, 
was made. (WGBH) 

1:30 M. S. ARNONI ON THE MIDDLE 
EAST: See details August 12. 

2:30 CLIFFORD MASON ON THEATER: 
See details August 12. 

3:00 NEGRO MUSIC with Charles Hobson. 
(August 19) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 MUSIC OF THE EIGHTEENTH CEN- 
TURY: See details August 16. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY w-ith a speaker to be 
announced. (August 23) 

7:00 THE CONDITION OF JEWISH BE- 

"T^LIEF #3: In this series distinguished 
Rabbis and theologians tell of their beliefs 
on the Torah as "divine revelation," the 
Jews as the "chosen people of God," Juda- 
ism as the one "true religion" and similar 
questions. Today's contributor is Dr. Ira 
Eisenstein, president of the Jewish Recon- 
structionist Foundation. (August 27) 

7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . LIBBY 
HOLMAN? The lady who introduced such 
standards as "Body and Soul" and "Can't 
We Be Friends?" "Moaning Low," and 
"Love for Sale'" tells Richard Lamparski 
where she has been and what she is doing. 
The Queen of the Torch Singers talks about 
Fred Allen, Clifton Webb, and Fred Mac- 
Murray. (August 23) 

8:00 99.5 RADIO THEATRE: "DEGREES": 

-^CThe 99.5 Radio Theatre, in cooperation 
with Theatre Genesis, presents a new play, 
Degrees, by George Birimisa and Charles 
Lewis. The play, first produced a year ago 
by the Off-Off-Broadway group at St. 
Mark's Church-in-the-Bouwerie, deals with 
the tangled situation confronted by a 
young New York doctor, his "room-mate," 
and a girl. Patrick Sullivan plays Dr. Rob- 
ert Ginsburg, Dan Leech is Louie, his 
room-mate, and Judy Wood plays Sheila. 
Murray Paskin directed both the original 
stage production and the radio version. 
Producers for WBAI are Baird Searles and 
Charles Lewis, with technical direction by 
Ed Woodard. To be rebroadcast in Sept. 

8:30 THE CHALLENGE OF OUR TIME: 
Conservative Habits Vs. Revolutionary 
Technological Change #2: The second of 
two lectures by historian Arnold Toynbee 
at Stanford University April 25, 1967. 
(KPFA) (August 31) 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A pe- 
riod reserved for programs of topical inter- 
est from the News and Public Affairs 
Dept. Details to be heard on Sunday eve- 
ning's A Look at the Listening. (August 23) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 23) 

11:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND PRO- 
GRAM: Recorded jazz presented by the 
pianist. (August 23) 



12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob— don't 
be upset by the hostility of these nonsenses 
— we're trying to annoy you into writing 
them yourself! 




7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry was filed 
between cat-carrier and stuffed alligator 
in the barter box. 

9:00 BAROQUE VOCAL MUSIC: 

Esaias Hickmann (1638-1691): Cantata: O 
tempis amatum (Soloists and the Nord- 
deutscher Singkreis; Instrumental Ensem- 
ble of the Archive Production; Gottfried 
Wolters, cond.) (Archive ARC 73227) 10m. 
George Frideric Handel (1685-1759): 
Utrecht Te Deum and Jubilate (Use Wolf, 
soprano: Helen Watts, alto; Wilfred 
Brown. Edgar Fleet, tenors; Thomas 
Helmsley. bass; Geraint Jones Singers and 
Orchestra; Geraint Jones, cond.) (Archive 
ARC 3133) 45m. 

Johann Kuhnau (1660-1722): Chorale Can- 
tata: Wie m lion leuchtet der Morgenstern 
(Soloists and the Norddeutscher Singkreis; 
Instrumental Ensemble of the Archive 
Production; Gottfried Wolters, cond.) (Ar- 
chive ARC 73227) 17m. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 22) 

10:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
LIBBY HOLMAN? Interview by Richard 
Lamparski. (August 22) 

11:00 COMMENTARY: (August 22) 

11:15 KAREL PACHTA, piano teacher, 
speaks about the teaching of music. The 
fourth in a series of five programs. 

11:45 THE MOVIES: A DURABLE STAR: 
Bob Sitton interviews Joan Crawford. (Au- 
gust 17) 

12:45 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The six- 
teenth episode in the reading of John 
Wyndham's novel. Read by Bill Cavness. 

1:15 COMPUTER MUSIC: See details Au- 
gust 15. 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A topi- 
cal report. (August 22) 

3:00 THE MARIAN McPARTLAND PRO- 
GRAM: Recorded jazz. (August 22) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #75: 

This series from the WBAI Archives con- 
tinues, as Gunther Schuller presents music 
from 1930: 

Kurt Weill: Mahagonny. 
(August 29) 

6:00 A PROPOSAL TO PRESERVE MUSI- 
CAL ENJOYMENT IN A WAY COM- 
PATIBLE WITH THE REQUIREMENTS 
OF AMERICAN BUSINESS AND LA- 
BOR: A talk from the 1962 WBAI Ar- 
chives by Auro Roselli. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY by Allard K Lowen- 
stein, attorney, educator, and author of 
Brutal Mandate, a study of apartheid in 
southern Africa. (August 24) 



7:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sar- 
ris. film critic for the Village Voice. (Au- 
gust 25) 

7:30 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 

with William Mandel, widely recognized 
authority on the Soviet Union and author 
of Russia Revisited. (KPFA) (August 24) 

7:45 A CONCERT FOR PEACE performed 

"^Con May 14, 1967. at The New School for 
Social Research. A program of works by 
Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by 
Peter Serkin and Michael Riesman, piano; 
Arnold Steinhardt, violin; Paula Sylvester, 
flute; with an orchestra conducted by 
Michael Riesman. (August 27) 

9:15 KNOWLEDGE WITHOUT WALLS 
#3: A series of lecture-discussion pro- 
grams by faculty members of S. F. State 
College devoted to re-thinking academic 
disciplines in response to contemporary 
experience. In this talk, delivered April 4, 
1967, Ernest Mundt, Professor of Art, dis- 
cusses Art for Life's Sake. (KPFA) 

10:00 JAZZ AT HOME with Chris Albert- 
son and occasional guests. 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 24) 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY: Contemporary 
jazz and new sounds generally presented 
by Elizabeth Vandermei. (August 28) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: 1 lb. sweet 
butter, 10 lbs. Kitty Litter, 6 veal cutlets, 
garbage bags. (This is my shopping list — 
no hidden meanings here) 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 24 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry loves 
humanity — he just hates people! 

9:00 EARLY TWENTIETH-CENTURY 
MUSIC: 

Igor Stravinsky: Symphony in E Flat, Op. 
1 (1905-7) (Columbia Symphony Orches- 
tra; Igor Stravinsky, cond.) (Columbia MS 
6989) 40m. 

Claude Debussy: Iberia (Chicago Sym- 
phony Orchestra; Fritz Reiner, cond.) 
(Victor LM-2222) 20m. 
Anton Webern: Quintet for String Quartet 
and Piano (1906) (Dorothy Wade, Ward 
Fenley, violins; Milton Thomas, viola; 
Emmet Sargeant, cello; Leonard Stein, pi- 
ano) (Columbia K4L-232) 11m. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 23) 

10:30 COMMENTARY by Allard K. Low- 
enstein. (August 23) 

10:45 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel (August 23) 

11:00 THE CRITICAL PEOPLE review the 
arts. See details August 20. 

12:15 COMMENTARY by a speaker from 
the Socialist Labor Party. (August 20) 

12:30 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: A read- 
ing of John Wyndham's classic science- 
fiction novel. The reader is Bill Cavness. 
(WGBH) 

1:00 MUSIC NOT FOR EXPORT: See de- 
tails August 17. 

2:00 ARTS EXTRA: A special program from 
the Drama and Literature Dept. (August 
21) 



WBA1 



Page 17 



3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Ira Gitler. 

(August 20) 
4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 

See page 21. 

5:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #1: See de- 
tails August 19. 

6:00 PROPOSAL FOR A CONTROLLED 
REVIVAL OF CANNIBALISTIC PRAC- 
TICES: A talk from the 1962 WBAI Ar- 
chives by Auro Roselli, American corres- 
pondent for II Giorno of Milan. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 REPORT TO THE LISTENER: The 
state-of-the-station, as seen by Frank Mills- 
paugh. (August 27) 

7:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 
A review of upcoming civic events, an- 
nounced by Frank Millspaugh. Produced 
by Susan Crayne. (August 25) 

7:15 LADY DAY: Eight years after her 

•^Cdeath in New York City, Billie Holiday's 
voice continues to captivate. The mystique 
of the "Lady with the Gardenia" is probed 
by Dizzy Gillespie, Lena Home and LeRoi 
Jones in San Francisco, Studs Terkel in 
Chicago and Frank Schiffman at Harlem's 
Apollo Theater. Unexpurgated passages 
from her autobiography, Lady Sings the 
Blues, are voiced by Lillian McKinney. 
Billie Holiday's records, including the 
banned "Gloomy Sunday," are featured. 
Narrated by Lloyd Edwards, Bill Hey- 
ward, Herb Kennedy and Dan Sorkin, the 
program is produced by KPFA volunteers 
Gene and Fabs De Alessi. (August 30) 

9:15 MISCELLANY 



9:30 TALK-BACK: A live discussion on cur- 
rent events, followed by a period during 
which listeners may ask questions of the 
participants by calling OX 7-8506. Pro- 
duced by Andy McGowan. 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 25) 

11:00 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N.: 
Correspondent Betty Pilkington analyzes 
some U.N. afairs usually ignored by the 
mass media. (August 25) 

11:30 MUSIC FROM THE RYUKYU 
ISLANDS, PART 3: The conclusion of 
Robert Garfias' presentation of this rarely 
heard music. (August 31) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: A trip to 
Never Never Land . . . oh . . . shouldn't 
use "trip" — I remember when "trip" meant 
trip — why are things so complicated? 



FRIDAY, AUGUST 25 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Now, when 
Larry takes a trip, there are no problems 
with semantics. That's what I like. 

9:00 MUSIC BY SIR WILLIAM WALTON: 
Facade: An Entertainment (Dame Edith 
Sitwell, Peter Pears, voices; The English 
Opera Group; Anthony Collins, cond.) 
(London A 4104) 38m. 



Symphony No. 2 (Cleveland Orchestra; 
George Szell, cond.) (Epic LC 3812) 27m. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 24) 

10:30 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N. 
with Betty Pilkington. (August 24) 

11:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Andrew Sar- 
ris. (August 23) 

11:30 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD 
announced by Frank Millspaugh. (August 
24) 

11:45 THE WARFARE BETWEEN THE 
MASS MEDIA AND THE INTELLEC- 
TUALS #13: See details August 18. 

12:15 THE MIDWICH CUCKOOS: The last 
of 18 readings of John Wyndham's classic 
science-fiction novel. The reader is Bill 
Cavness, and the program comes to us from 
WGBH. 

12:45 NASSAR RASTEGAR-NEJAD plays 
and sings music in the ancient Persian tra- 
dition. See further details August 20. 

2:00 ROBERT GRAVES READS FROM 
HIS POETRY AND FROM "THE 
WHITE GODDESS." (August 19) 

2:45 MUSIC NOT FOR EXPORT: See de- 
tails August 18. 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC: Music by 
Kirchner, Rochberg, Dallapiccola. and 
Ben Weber. (August 11) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 SPECIAL REPORT: A news report on 
a topical event from the News and Public 
Affairs Dept. (August 26) 



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te--- e --3Jk J^Jf 



Page 18 



WBAI 



7:15 COMMENTARY with Thomas Fran- 
cis Ritt, one of the "new breed" of Ameri- 
can Catholics. (August 28) 

7:30 ACTUALITE par Theo Loir, journa- 
liste, correspondant a New York de Radio 
Television Beige et Radio Lausanne (Inter- 
views, reportages and guest of the week). 
(August 26) 

7:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re- 
port compiled by the Public Affairs and 
News Department. Details to be heard on 
Sunday evening's A Look at the Listening. 
(August 28) 

8:45 MISCELLANY 

9:00 MUSIC NOT FOR EXPORT: Brazil 
before the Bossa Nova. Affectionate recol- 
lections of two musical cariocas of another 
generation. Presented by Joe Coor>er. 
Heitor Villa-Lobos: Serestas-Complete 
Song Cycle. Maria de la Lourdes Cruz 
Lopes, soprano; Gerardo Parente, piano 
(Brazilian Odeon MOFB 3313) 
Carmen Miranda, The Brazilian Bomb- 
shell. 12 songs performed by the Brazilian 
vocalist and her Bando da Lua. (Ace of 
Hearts AH 99) (KPFK) 

10:00 THE COMPANY SHE KEPT: An in- 
terview with Doris Grumbach, author of 
TCSK — a recent biography of Mary Mc- 
Carthy. Mrs. Grumbach describes her in- 
volvement with and estrangement from 
Mary McCarthy and gives a lady-like as- 
sessment of Miss McCarthy's personal and 
literary achievements. Rose Mary Ander- 
son is the interviewer. 

10:30 NEWS with Mike Hodel. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 26) 

11:00 BROOKLYN CORE is considered one 

■^Cof the most militant civil rights chapters 
in the country. Bedford Stuyvesant's Brook- 
lyn CORE is famous for the stall-in and 
demonstrations at the opening of the 
World's Fair in New York. This chapter 
also helped launch the school boycotts in 
New York and were instrumental in the 
down-state demonstrations — a protest 
against construction unions that resulted 
in over 800 arrests — perhaps the largest 
civil rights demonstration in the North in 
terms of arrests. Brooklyn CORE is cur- 
rently involved in a struggle with the New 
York Board of Education over the quality 
of education in ghetto schools. On this 
program, members and officials of Brook- 
lyn CORE will be interviewed. Parts of 
a meeting will be recorded. Produced and 
recorded by Leroy Bowser and Charles 
Hobson. (August 31) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass 
really doesn't exist ... we all take turns, 
and that's why he seems to have so many 
facets to his personality. 



SATURDAY, AUGUST 26 



8:00 TWENTIETH-CENTURY RUSSIAN 
MUSIC: 

Tikhon Khrennikov (1930-): Symphony 
No. 1 in B Flat Minor, Op. 4 (State Radio 
Orchestra of the U.S.S.R.; Alexander 
Gauk, cond.) (Westminster XWN 18678) 
22m. 



Rodion Shchedrin (1932-): Symphonic 
Suite from the Opera 'Not Love Alone' 
(Irina Arkhipova, mezzo-soprano; Moscow 
Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra; Kiril 
Kondrashin, cond.) (Angel SR-40011) 35m. 
Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-): Symphony 
No. 9 in E Flat, Op. 70 (Symphony Or- 
chestra of Radio Berlin; Rolf Kleiner, 
cond.) (Urania URLP 7128) 26m. 

9:30 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

10:30 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
August 25. 

10:45 SPECIAL REPORT from the News 
and Public Affairs Departments. August 
25. 

11:15 ACTUALITE with Theo Loir. Au- 
gust 25. 

11:30 COUNTRY MUSIC with Tom Whit- 
more. August 20 

12:00 STEPHEN CRANE — THE RED 
BADGE OF COURAGE: Edmund 
O'Brien reads a shortened version of 
Stephen Crane's novel of man in panic, 
shattered by war and finally remade in its 
imaee. (Caedmon TC 1040) 

1:00 RECOLLECTIONS OF THE ABRA- 
HAM LINCOLN BRIGADE: Steve Nel- 
son, political commissar with the Abraham 
Lincoln Brigade, one of the four English- 
speaking battalions in the Abraham Lin- 
coln (International) Brigade during the 
Spanish Civil War, talks about the war 
during the period from 1936 through 1938. 
Harold Quigley, Leader of the Ethical Cul- 
ture Society of Los Angeles is his host. 
(KPFK) 

2:00 TWO HOURS OF FOLK MUSIC: 
Hostesses Tracey McNamara and Jones 
Alk discuss and play folk music from all 
over the world (including the United 
States). 

4:00 LAND, WATER AND POWER MO- 
NOPOLY IN CALIFORNIA: Evasion of 
Federal 160-acre Limit Laws (#6) Dr. 
Paul Taylor of the Dept. of Economics at 
U.C., Bkly., gives his views on current 
irrigation practices in California agricul- 
ture in the light of federal laws on acreage 
limitation. (KPFA) 

4:30 MISCELLANY 

4:45 LONDON FESTIVAL OF AMERI- 
CAN ARTS AND HUMANITIES: New 
York Chamber Soloists: 
Tenor Charles Bressler and five instru- 
mentalists in a program of twentieth-cen- 
tury compositions, several of them written 
especially for this ensemble. 
Elliott Schwartz: Quartet for Oboe and 
Strings (1962) 

Vaughn Williams: Seven Blake Songs for 
Tenor and Oboe 

Walter Piston: Duo for Viola and 'Cello 
Hindemith: Martinslied, for tenor, flute, 
oboe, violin, viola, 'cello, and harpsichord 
Mel Powell: Two Prayer Settings for tenor, 
oboe, violin, viola, and 'cello (1964) 
Britten: Phantasy Quartet for oboe, violin, 
viola, and 'cello 

Hugh Aitken: Cantata #1 on Elizabethan 
Texts, for tenor, oboe, violin, viola, and 
'cello (1958) (KPFA) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Chuck Lindholm. 

6:45 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 
Julty who does not own a car. (August 28) 



7:00 TAKING STOCK OF WALL STREET: 

William A. Kent, analyst of Philips, Appel 
and Walden, interviews economists, stock 
market analysts and authors with an icon- 
oclastic view of Wall Street. (August 28) 

7:30 CLIFFORD MASON ON THEATER: 
Mr. Mason interviews Loften Mitchell, 
author of Black Drama. Produced by Rose 
Mary Anderson. To be rebroadcast in 
September. 

8:00 TWO CONCERTS BY THE BORODIN 

-+CQUARTET #1: 

Late in June the Borodin Quartet gave two 

concerts at the University of California. 

The performances are first-rate. The first 

concert includes: 

Shostakovich: Quartet in F (#3), op. 73 

Haydn: Quartet in D ("Lark"), op. 64 no. 5 

Ravel: Quartet in F 

To be rebroadcast in September. (KPFA) 

9:30 FROM VERSE TO VERSE: A selec- 

"T^tion of English Poetry. Alfred Rothschild 
reads and comments on more of his favor- 
ite English and American poetry. Mr. 
Rothschild, editor of the New Bantam 
edition of Shakespeare's Plays, also pro- 
duces WBAI's SHAKESPEARE WITH A 
DIFFERENCE. (August 31) 

10:00 NEGRO MUSIC: Again Charles Hob- 
son offers us recordings not usually heard 
by white radio audiences, such as rhythm 
and blues, gospel music and calypso. Mr. 
Hobson often has guest musicians and 
musicologists on his program. (August 29) 

11:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #2: The 
complete play The Exception and The 
Rule, with the original cast of the off 
Broadway production including Joseph 
Chaikin and Paul Richards, directed by 
WBAI's Isaiah Sheffer. (Folkways FL 9849 
by permission) (August 31) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE: Steve Post is defi- 
nitely not my uncle. Whose uncle is he 
then? 



SUNDAY, AUGUST 27 



8:00 A CONCERT FOR PEACE: See de- 
tails, August 23. 

9:30 MUSIC OF THE WORLD'S PEO- 
PLES: The late Dr Henry Cowell con- 
tinues his series — from the WBAI archives. 

10:00 GOLDEN VOICES: Anthony Boucher 
presents great operatic recordings from the 
past. (KPFA) 

10:30 REPORT TO THE LISTENER by 
Station Manager, Frank Millspaugh. (Au- 
gust 24) 

10:45 MARSHALL WINDMILLER RE- 
PORTS #2: See details, August 19. 

11:15 SEARCH FOR SURVIVAL #3: See 
details August 21. 

12:15 PRINCE IGOR: Borodin's magnum 
opus, was fashioned after the epic Tale of 
Igor's Campaign, written in the 12th cen- 
tury by an unknown Kievan monk. Prince 
Igor, one of the most melodic and lyric 
operas in the Russian repertory, was left 
unfinished by the composer, but later com- 
pleted by Rimsky-Korsakoff and Glazu- 
nov. Today, it is one of the most exciting 
and popular performances in the U.S.S.R. 
(Of minor trivial information is the fact 



WBAI 



Page 19 



that it is this opera from which the musical 
Kismet was taken.) 

4:00 NIGHT INTO DAY: The best of Radio 
Unnameable. Boh Fass's nightly program 
of music and talk. 

5:00 THE CONDITION OF JEWISH BE- 
LIEF #3: See details August 22. 

5:30 FROM GIOVANNI'S ROOM: James 
Baldwin reads from Giovanni's Room. 
From the WBAI Archives. 

5:45 COUNTRY MUSIC with Tom Whit- 
more. (September 2) 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Harry Goodman. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with a speaker from 
the Socialist Labor Party. (August 31) 

7:00 BOOKS TO BUY, BORROW OR 
BURN: A variety of books on a variety 
of topics, reviewed by a variety of people. 
(August 28) 

7:15 RENDEZVOUS: Varietes francaises a 
New York: spectacles, arts, lettres, et idees 
a l'ordre du jour. Une emission realisee 
avec le concours des Services Culturels 
francais, et presentee en francais par Odette 
de la Tour, et Jean-Louis de Turenne. 

8:15 NOAH GREENBERG, the late direc- 

■^Ctor of the New York Pro Musica, speaks 
with Ann McMillan and presents music 
discovered in Georgia, U.S.S.R , during a 
N. Y. Pro Musica tour to Russia in 1964. 
(From WBAI archives) 

9:45 MISSISSIPPI ELECTIONS NOVEM- 

-fCBER '67: A panel discussion on the coming 
November 1967 elections in Mississippi by 
Dorothy Jones, Director of the Office of 
Church and Race. Protestant Council of 
the City of New York; Sandra Nystrom, ad- 
ministrator of the National Committee for 
Free Elections in Sunflower County and 
Robert Z. Lewis, Esq., Chairman of the 
New York Committee for Support of the 
Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. 
All the panelists have been recently to 
Mississippi and witnessed the May 2 spe- 
cial election that saw the defeat of the 
MFDP slate of candidates in spite of the 
fact that there was a majority of registered 
black voters. They will discuss the food 
stamp program, welfare and the child de- 
velopment program. The moderator and 
producer of this program is Charles Hob- 
son. (To be rebroadcast in September.) 

10:45 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING: A 
review of the important coming programs 
on WBAI bv Mike Hodel (August 28) 

11:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Don 
Schlitten, A&R and art director for Pres- 
tige Records, long-time student of jazz 
history and noted jazz photographer. (Au- 
gust 31) 

12:00 THE OUTSIDE: Everybody who reads 
this, send one penny to Steve Post . . . help 
send a Kid to summer camp. 



MONDAY, AUGUST 28 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: But I don't 

wanna go to school, mommy. 
9:00 MEDIEVAL MUSIC: 

Featuring works by Adam de la Halle 
(C. 1220-1287) 



Adam de la Halle: Le Jeu de Robin et 
Marion; 13 Rondeaux (Pro Music Antiqua; 
Safford Cape, dir.) (Archive ARC 3002) 
23m. 

Chansons and Motets of the 13th Century; 
by Bernart de Ventacorn, Jaufre Rudel, 
Guirat Riquier, and anonymous works. 
(Pro Musica Antiqua: Safford Cape, dir.) 
(Archive ARC 3051) 26m. 
17 French Dances of the 13th and 14th 
Centuries; by Raimbaut de Vaqueiras, 
Guillaume d'Amiens, and anonymous 
works (Archive ARC 3002) 19m. 

10:00 COMMENTARY by Thomas Francis 
Ritt. one of the "New Breed" of American 
Catholics. (August 25) 

10:30 NEWS FOR CAR OWNERS with Sam 
Julty. (August 26) 

10:45 TAKING STOCK OF WALL 
STREET with William Kent, analyst. (Au- 
gust 26) 

1 1:15 A LOOK AT THE LISTENING: Mike 
Hodel tells of coming WBAI programs. 
(August 27) 

11:30 MORTON FELDMAN: Music and 
talk by the modern composer. (August 21) 

12:45 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re 
broadcast of the August 25 program. 

1:45 BOOKS TO BUY. BORROW OR 
BURN: Book reviews by a variety of 
critics. (August 27) 

2:00 FROM THE MIDWAY #1173: B F. 
Skinner, the Fdgar Pierce professor of 
Psychology at Harvard University, dis- 
cusses Utopian Speculation. 

3:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY: Elizabeth Van- 
dermei with music of the times. (August 23) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 TWENTIETH CENTURY CONCER- 
TOS: A rebroadcast of the August 21 pro- 
gram. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with Conrad Lynn. 
(August 29) 

7:00 CHRISTIANITY IN CRISIS. With 
Robert Ortiz. WBAI's Christianity Direc- 
tor. (August 29) 

7:15 THE FISHERMAN AND HIS SOUL: 

"T^Kathleen Dalton reads the fairy tale by 
Oscar Wilde about a fisherman who sacri- 
fices his soul for the love of a mermaid. 
This is the fifth in a series of Wilde's 
stories read by Miss Dalton. (To be re- 
broadcast in September) 

9:00 THE SEARCH FOR SURVIVAL #4: 

"T^Red Cloak for Breakfast: This program, 
produced by Peter Bergmann, David Oss- 
man, and Craig Carpenter, sets forth the 
Hopi Life Plan and the Indian Prophecy 
of Purification. This program carries a 
strong message regarding the fundamentals 
of personal life and national policy. (To 
be rebroadcast in September) 

10:00 FROM THE CENTER FOR THE 
STUDY OF DEMOCRATIC INSTITU- 
TIONS: Operation Bootstrap #4: Let the 
Rage Uncoil: A highly personal and per- 
ceptive account from Gene Hoffman about 
her visit to Operation Bootstrap. (August 
31) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 29) 

11:00 THE MOVIES: The Theater Owner: 
Bob Sitton talks with Sherrill C. Corwin, 



President of the National Association of 
Theater Owners, who owns the Metropoli- 
tan Theaters of Los Angeles, and describes 
the impact of television on the small town 
theater owner, the relationship of NATO 
to college movie houses, and daylight sav- 
ing time. Also an advisor to the proposed 
American Film Institute. Mr. Corwin gives 
an industry view of film education. 

11:30 MUSIC OF IGOR STRAVINSKY: 
For details, see August 17. 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass 
is human. 



TUESDAY, AUGUST 29 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Next month, 
Larry will write his own copy, or be re- 
duced to "with Larry Josephson" every 
morning. 

9:00 MUSIC BY HEINRICH VON BIBER: 
For details please refer to August 15 
listings. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 28) 

10:30 COMMENTARY with Civil Liberties 
Lawyer, Conrad Lynn. (August 28) 

10:45 CHRISTIANITY IN CRISIS with 
Robert Ortiz of WBAI. (August 28) 

11:00 COLLECTORS AND COLLECTING 
#5: A rebroadcast of our Sunday after- 
noon series. In this program. Dr. Richard 
Rush, author of Prices and Values, talks 
about "Art as an Investment." 

12:15 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #75: Gunther Schuller's series 
continues. For details see August 23 list- 
ings. 

1:15 MISCELLANY 

1:30 THE TET VIGIL: Two participants of 
the fast at Grace Cathedral talk with Lou 
Hartman. (August 20) 

2:30 GERMAN POETRY read by Alfred 
Rothschild. (August 20) 

3:00 NEGRO MUSIC: Charles Hobson pre- 
sents R&R, R&B. Gospel and Calypso. 
(August 26) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 FIFTEENTH AND SIXTEENTH 
CENTURY MUSIC: For details see Au- 
gust 17. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY with a speaker to be 
announced. (August 30) 

7:00 THE CONDITION OF JEWISH BE- 

"f^LIEF #4: Today's contributor is Dr. Eu- 
gene Borowitz. Professor of Education and 
Jewish Religious Thought at Hebrew Union 
College— Jewish Institute of Religion in 
New York City. (Reform) (To be rebroad- 
cast in September) 

7:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
"STELLA DALLAS?" In that throaty 
voice which was famous for so many years 
as the heroine of one of radio's most pop- 
ular soap operas, Ann Elster tells Richard 
Lamparski about her "Lollie Baby" and 
the heartaches she endured. The program 
will include Stella's theme "How can I 
Leave Thee?" if Richard can talk his 
Grandmother into playing it on the organ. 
(August 30) 



Page 20 

8:00 GROUP FOR CONTEMPORARY 
-K MUSIC AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY: 

The final concert of the 1965-66 season, 

held on April 25, 1966. (This program was 

preempted when it was originally scheduled 

last year.) 

Mao Min-Chung (Transcribed by Chou 

Wen-Chung From "Yu-ko" for Chi'in) (c. 

1280; 1965) 

Gunther Schuller: Woodwind Quintet 

(1958) 

Stefan Wolpe: Piece in Two Parts for Flute 

and Piano (1960) 

Charles Dodge: Folia (1965) 

Anton Webern: Vier Stiicke fur Geige und 

Klavier, Op. 7 (1960) 

Harvey Sollberger: Solos for Violin and 

Five Instruments (1962) 

(To be rebroadcast in September) 

9:15 MISCELLANY 

9:30 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A pro- 
gram of immediate interest in this field 
produced with the personal assistance of 
the News Director. (August 30) 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 30) 

11:00 SONIA MALKINE sings songs and 
plays music. (September 4) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Bob Fass 
wears silly pink ear phones! Now isn't 
That something. 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 30 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: Larry, we love 
you. 

9:00 TWENTIETH-CENTURY ORCHES- 
TRAL MUSIC: 

Bela Bartok (1881-1945): Concerto for 
Two Pianos, Percussion, and Orchestra 

(1940) (Arthur Gold, Robert Fitzdale, pi- 
anos; Saul Goodman, timpani 
Walter Rosenberger, Elden Bailey, Morris 
Lang, percussion; New York Philharmon- 
ic; Leonard Bernstein, cond.) (Columbia 
MS 6956) 24m. 

Zoltan Kodaly (1882-1967): Variations on 
a Hungarian Folk Song (1937-39) (Brno 
State Philharmonic Orchestra; Janos Fe- 
rencsik, cond.) (Crossroads 22 16 0095) 
27m. 

Charles Ives (1847-1954): Hallowe'en 
(Members of the Oslo Philharmonic Or- 
chestra; William Strickland, cond.) 2m. 
Carl Ruggles (1876-): Sun Treader (Co- 
lumbia Symphony Orchestra; Zoltan 
Rozsnyai, cond.) (Columbia MS 6801) 18m. 

10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 
(August 29) 

10:30 WHATEVER BECAME OF . . . 
"STELLA DALLAS?" Richard Lamparski 
interviews. (August 29) 

11:00 COMMENTARY with a speaker to 
be announced. (August 29) 

11:15 KAREL PACHTA, piano teacher, 
speaks about the teaching of music. The 
last in a series of five programs. 

11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 LADY DAY: A documentary on the 
late Billie Holiday from KPFA. (August 
24) 

2:00 PUBLIC AFFAIRS SPECIAL: A re- 



port in depth. (August 29) 

3:00 SONIA MALKINE sings and plays 
records. (August 29) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 2 1 . 

5:00 CONTEMPORARY MUSIC IN EVO- 
LUTION #76: Music from the years 
1930-31, presented by Gunther Schuller: 
Arnold Schoenberg: Begleitungsmusik fiir 
eine Filmszene 
Carl Ruggles: Portals 

Heitor Villa-Lobos: Bacheanas Brasileiras 
No. 2 (excerpt) 

Bela Bartok: Piano Concerto No. 2 (ex- 
cerpt) 

Ruth Crawford-Seeger: String Quartet 
Edgar Varese: Ionization 
(September 5) 

6:00 IT SHOULD HAPPEN TO A DOG: 
A one-act play by Wolf Mankowitz, from 
the 1963 WBAI Archives. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 COMMENTARY by Allard K. Lowen- 
stein, author of Brutal Mandate, a study of 
discrimination in southern Africa. (August 
31) 

7:00 FILMS IN FOCUS with Village Voice 
critic Andrew Sarris. (September 1) 

7:30 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 
with William Mandel, widely recognized 
authority on the Soviet Union and author 
of Russia Revisited. (KPFA) (August 31) 

7:45 CARL BRANDEN'S OPINIONS: The 
"r* Executive Director of the Southern Con- 
ference Educational Fund discusses with 
Elsa Knight Thompson his views on a 
variety of subjects including the present 
civil rights picture, and the political scene 
in the South. (KPFA) 

8:45 CALVIN HAMPTON, composer and 

■^Corganist, performs an organ concert of 
works by Bach, Dupre, Erwin, Telemann, 
and Messiaen. (August 31) 

10:00 JAZZ AT HOME with Chris Albert- 
son and occasional guests. 

10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 

10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 

11:00 SOUNDS OF TODAY: The most con- 
temporary jazz, with Elizabeth Vandermei. 
(September 4) 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Once again, 
the subliminal hostility hour. 



THURSDAY, AUGUST 31 



7:00 IN THE BEGINNING: If you gotta 

go, you might as well do it in tune to The 

Vatican Rag. 
9:00 CALVIN HAMPTON, composer and 

organist, performs an organ concert of 

works by Bach, Dupre, Erwin, Telemann, 

and Messiaen. (August 30) 
10:15 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 

(August 30) 
10:30 COMMENTARY by Allard K. Low- 

enstein. (August 30) 
10:45 REVIEW OF THE SOVIET PRESS 

with William Mandel. (KPFA) (August 30) 
11:00 FROM THE CENTER: OPERATION 

BOOTSTRAP #4: See details August 28. 
11:30 COMMENTARY by a speaker from 

the Socialist Labor Party. (August 27) 



WBAI 

11:45 MISCELLANY 

12:00 MUSIC FROM THE RYUKYU 
ISLANDS, PART 3: See details August 24. 

12:30 FROM VERSE TO VERSE: A selec- 
tion of English poetry read by Alfred 
Rothschild. (August 26) 

1:00 BROOKLYN CORE: The militant 
chapter examined by Leroy Bowser and 
Charles Hobson, with interviews and part 
of a meeting. (August 25) 

2:00 THE CHALLENGE OF OUR TIME: 
Conservative Habits Vs. Revolutionary 
Technological Change #2: See details Au- 
gust 22. 

3:00 THE SCOPE OF JAZZ with Don 
Schlitten. (August 27) 

4:00 PROGRAMS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE: 
See page 21. 

5:00 BENTLEY ON BRECHT #2: See de- 
tails August 26. 

6:00 THE SCAR ON THE AMERICAN 
SPIRIT: A talk from the 1964 WBAI Ar- 
chives. Henry Steele Commager traces the 
development of science and education. 

6:15 MISCELLANY 

6:30 NEWS with Paul Schaffer. 

6:45 REPORT TO THE LISTENER with 
Frank Millspaugh, WBAI's General Man- 
ager. (September 3) 

7:00 COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD: 
Announcements about events sponsored by 
civic and non-profit organizations upcom- 
ing in the next week. Read by Frank Mills- 
paugh, produced by Susan Crayne. (Sep- 
tember 1) 

7:15 OF UNICORNS AND UNIVERSES: 
Baird Searles surveys the fields of science 
fiction and fantasy bi-weekly both in the 
printed word (books and magazines) and 
in the performing arts. (September 3) 

7:30 SENATOR WAYNE MORSE AT U.C.; 
The senior senator from Oregon, speaking 
under the auspices of the Inter-Fraternity 
Council of the University of California on 
Sproul Hall steps in Berkeley May 21, 
1967. He is introduced by Fred Bass, 1st. 
vice-president of the Associated Students 
at U.C. (KPFA) 

8:30 ANTONIONI'S "BLOW-UP," A RE- 
VIEW: by James F. Scott. Many people 
who have already seen the film, felt they 
must have seen something else after read- 
ing this review which was published in 
Cross Current Quarterly, the Spring edi- 
tion. If you missed any of the symbolism 
chances are you will find this program will 
provide an interesting interpretation of the 
film. 

9:00 IS THE U.N. SUBVERSIVE?: A sear- 
ing indictment of the United Nations by 
Lt. Col. Arch E. Roberts (A.U.S. Ret.) 
who believes that the U.N. is out to take 
over the U.S. and turn it into a one-world 
monolithic supra-government. He also 
accuses the U.S. of waging a "no-win war" 
in Vietnam. Mike Hodel is the interviewer. 
9:30 TALK-BACK: A live discussion of a 
current event, followed by a period during 
which listeners may ask questions of the 
participants by calling OX 7-8506. 
10:30 NEWS with Paul Fischer. 
10:45 WAR SUMMARY with Paul Schaffer. 

(September 1) 
11:00 THE OTHER SIDE OF THE U.N.: 
Correspondent Betty Pilkington analyzes 
some U.N. affairs usually ignored by the 



WBAI 



mass media. (September 1) 

11:30 ANGEL LOVES NOBODY: Richard 
Miles, author of the recent novel Angel 
Loves Nobody, talks about the explosive 
situation of minority-group students in 
public schools. The novel is based on his 
own experience as a probation officer in 
California: Mr Miles feels that the problem 
is critical and offers some suggestions for 
solving it. Rose Mary Anderson is the 
interviewer. 

12:00 RADIO UNNAMEABLE: Let's all 
call OX 7-2288 and beg Bob NOT to play 
Alice's Restaurant tonight . . . see what 
happens. 



CHILDREN'S PROGRAMS 

AUGUST IS THE ONLY MONTH WITH- 
OUT A LEGAL HOLIDAY. SO EVERY 
DAY WILL BE A HOLIDAY FOR YOUNG 
PEOPLE ON WBAI. WE'VE PLANNED 
SOME SPECIAL PROGRAMS WHICH WE 
HOPE YOU ENJOY. 

Tues., Aug. 1 — Face to Face with Ron Mace, 
Maxine Halelf, and a cast of 1000's, fol- 
lowed by Bonnie's show. 
Weds., Aug. 2 — Odette continues her series 
on People and Places of France. Today 
she talks about Louis XIV, the Sun-King. 
(Why was he called The Sun King? Odette 
will explain.) Followed by "Variations on 
a Nursery Song" by Dohnanyi, a Hun- 
garian composer. 
Thurs., Aug. 3 — Watkins Rock rides again. 
Fri., Aug. 4 — Carl Sandburg reads his Poems 
for Children. Listen carefully: you'll hear 
about "The Abracadabra Boys," "Love 
Letters to Hans Christian Andersen," and 
"Anywhere and Everywhere People." Then 
there'll be a program on Children's Games 
round the world — and you'll be invited to 
send in your favorites. 
Sat., Aug. 5 — Ronnie continues reading. 
Then, in honor of Youth Day at Expo 67, 
we'll have a program of international folk 
songs. 
Mon., Aug. 7 — "Swallows and Amazons:" 
Baird Searles, Drama and Literature di- 
rector of WBAI, presents a personal tribute 
to Arthur Ransome, with readings from 
Mr. Ransome's stories. 
Tues., Aug. 8 — Face to Face with Ron and 

Maxine, and Bonnie in person. 
Weds., Aug. 9 — Odette takes us to New Or- 
leans this week (did you know New Orleans 
was founded by the French?). Then we 
hear Dylan Thomas, a wild Welsh poet, 
remember "An Outing" from his boyhood 
(a BBC recording). 
Thurs., Aug. 10— Watkins Rock— ready-set- 
go! 
Fri., Aug. 11 — Fact Day: first, we hear some 
speeches by Franklin Delano Roosevelt; 
then, even further back in history, an In- 
troduction to the American Indian, in fact, 
story, and song. 
Sat., Aug. 12 — Another chapter from Ron- 
nie's book, followed by Benjamin Britten's 
"Young People's Guide to the Orchestra," 
which tells you how and why the different 
instruments play. 
Mon., Aug. 14 to Wed., Aug. 16— "Zeely"— 
we are happy to present a special program, 



Page 21 



a kind of "story-marathon." Odette reads 
a new novel called "Zeely" by Virginia 
Hamilton, about a Negro girl from Queens 
who tries to find out about her African 
ancestors, personified in a regal Watusi 
couple. Odette also interviews the author, 
Miss Hamilton. Haven't you always wanted 
to hear how a writer got his or her ideas? 

Thurs., Aug. 17 — For a change of pace, listen 
to Watkins Rock. 

Fri., Aug. 18 — Today we hear a variety of 
Russian folk songs, and then, since you're 
all anxious to go to the beach, "The Voice 
of the Sea." Imagine you're sitting by the 
ocean, buried in sand, listening to the 
waves . . . 

Sat., Aug. 19 — The next installment of Ron- 
nie's Reading, followed by Langston 
Hughes, a famous American Negro poet 
who died this past spring, telling about and 
playing jazz, music which he loved be- 
cause it was so full of life. 

Mon., Aug. 21 — "The Emperor's Night- 
ingale." a fairy tale read by Margie King. 
The story takes place in the land of "the 
silver apples of the moon, the golden apples 
of the sun." Have you ever heard a night- 
ingale sing? 

Tues., Aug. 22 — Face to Face with Ron and 
Maxine: and Bonnie is back. 

Wed., Aug. 23 — Odette goes to Brittany this 
week, telling us about the legends and 
customs of this sea-coast province of 
France. Then, since the people in Brittany 
are related to the people in Wales, we hear 
two Welsh folk-tales, "The Fairy Harp" 
and "The Ancients," written down by 
Eowhen Jones. 

Thurs., Aug. 24 — Time for Caryn and David 
Watkins. 

Fri., Aug. 25 — "The Red Balloon" — a record 
of the French film about a little boy and 
his marvelous, magical balloon. 

Sat., Aug. 26 — What is Ronnie reading this 
week? How will it all turn out? Then stay 
tuned for Saint-Saens' "Carnival of the 
Animals." 

Mon., Aug. 28— The Real Story, with Richard 
Schiffman. 

Tues., Aug. 29— It's almost time for school 
to start — but before that, it's time for Face 
to Face and Bonnie's program. 

Wed., Aug. 30— Bonjour! Odette talks about 
Victor Hugo, the French writer, and then 
we all "Listen to the Little French Band." 

Thurs., Aug. 31— Rock out of August with 
the Watkins. 



BARTER ITEMS 

The barter department has, left over from our recent 
Marathon, a great assortment of animals, jewelry, 
books and records up for purchase at this time. In 
addition, we also have various sorts of transit, baby 
sitting, dates, secretarial service and lessons in many 
divergent facets of human endeavor. If you are in- 
terested in any of these items, or in any of the items 
that follow, please call the barter department at 
OX 7-2993 weekdays, between 4 and 6 p.m. 

CLOTHING 

Lady's pants suit. Made to order, any size 8-14. 

(Retail: $90.00)— $50.00 
Fire engine-red vest. Owned by Ed Sanders: 

$20.00 
Yves St. Laurent women's scarf: $25.00 
Six scarves. Five wool, one silk: $12.00 for all six. 

APPLIANCES 

New Monitor Jet clothes dryer. 16 x 16 x 32: $75.00 
Antique pot-bellied stove: $50.00 



BOOKS AND MAGAZINES 

Autographed copy of Youngblood Hawk by Her- 
man Wouk: $50.00 

N. Y. Times, Daily News, N. Y. World-Telegram 
. . . , and N. Y. Post from November 22, 23, 24, 
25, 1963. Approximately 15 papers in all: $5.00 

Twenty-nine volumes of Thackeray: $30.00 

Footlocker of rare Nazi books (art, propaganda, 
etc.): $700.00 

First hardcover edition of The Mechanical Bride 
by McLuhan: $40.00 

Will Durant's Story of Civilization; eight volumes 
in mint condition: $50.00 

First Edition of For Whom the Bell Tolls: $50.00 

Charles Darwin, Second Edition (probably 1874): 
The Descent and Selection in Relation to Sex: 
$25.00 

Mark Twain, twenty-four volumes: $50.00 

Victor Hugo, fifteen volumes: $25.00 

AUTOGRAPHS 

Four-page letter by Ezra Pound, typed with sig- 
nature. Advice to a young writer: highest bid. 

British Magazine, "Dance and Dancers," auto- 
graphed by Nureyev and Fonteyn: $15.00 

Autographed Simon and Garfunkel program from 
Brooklyn College concert: $15.00 

Authenticated Einstein letter to an editor of a 
magazine, concerning one of his favorite Ger- 
man proverbs on the nature of free will: Bids 
start at $200.00 

A 1935 Romeo and Juliet playbill, autographed 
by thirty-three members of star cast, includ- 
ing Katherine Cornell, Orson Welles: $50.00 

Mark Twain, signature (page from a European 
Duchess' guest book, about four lines): Bids 
start at $1,500 (half to WBAI) 

Autographed photo of Steve Post asleep at con- 
trols: $10.00 

1911 Theodore Roosevelt note. Typewritten with 
signature on letterhead of "Outlook:" $50.00 

BUTTONS 

F. D. Roosevelt campaign button: $5.00 

Harlem Six buttons: $1.00 

Button: "Don't Buy Japanese Goods — Quarantine 
the Aggressor:" $1.50 

Campaign button for Vincent Impelitteri (seven- 
inch diameter): $5.00 

Original JFK campaign button, very large: $5.00 

AUTOMOBILES AND AUTOMOTIVE EQUIPMENT 

1956 air-conditioned Cadillac Limousine: $500.00 
1953 Volkswagen Microbus Deluxe. Needs some 

work: $150.00 
Bell crash helmet. Sizes 7Va to 7V4: $25.00 

AUDIO AND ELECTRONICS 

Zenith transoceanic portable radio. AM and 9 

short wave bands: $50.00 

(lists for $200.00) 
Magnavox table radio: $25.00 
Harmon Kardon preamp and amp 120 — stereo: 

$200.00 

FILMS, PHOTOGRAPHS, DRAWINGS 
AND PAINTINGS 

Matted self-portrait, in pencil of Alfred Hitch- 
cock: $25.00 

Original art of Arthur Schlesinger that appeared 
in Ramparts: $200.00 

Numbered and signed Chagall lithograph: Paris 
Opera Ceiling in an edition of 200: $450.00 

Picasso prints of three different subjects in an 
edition of 125: $50.00 

Three minute film of Larry the J eating a bagel: 
$30.00 

Print of "The General" of Buster Keaton. One 
hour long/ 16mm: $300.00 

Autographed picture of Charles Schutz: $5.00 

ASSORTED NON SEQUITURS 

Orson Welles in Julius Caesar. Set of 8 78 rpm 

discs: $25.00 
Lockheed 60" bow (30 pound): $20.00 
30 pound fibre glass bow: $15.00 
Five hundred custom printed combs. Five inches 

long — guaranteed not to break: $30.00 
Almost new Atlas baby carriage: $25.00 
Modern design teak desk: $75.00 
8' x 10' Spanish rug: $125.00 

AND MANY MORE 



FOLIO CLASSIFIED 



No advertisement in this Folio is to be construed as 
an endorsement of any organization of business by 
WBAI or vice versa. 

Rate per Insertion (10 word minimum) 30c per word; 
6 or more continuous insertions, 25c per word. 
Send printed or typewritten copy with check or 
money to WBAI Folio Advertising, 30 East 39th 
Street, New York. N. Y. 10016. OX 7-2288. Dead- 
line 4 weeks in advance of beginning date of Folio. 
All advertisements appearing in the Folio are ad- 
dressed to all persons — no discriminatory ads, please. 



Page 22 



WBA! 



OUT OF SIGHT EAR PIERCING 

The CONRAD SHOP will pierce your ear(s) prop- 
erly while you admire our collection of fine 
jewelry in precious metal and sculpture in base 
metal. 

THE CONRAD SHOP 

In the heart of Greenwich Village 

Phone: GR 3-5355 

Open 3 P.M. to 11 P.M., except Sundays 

WBAI ANNOUNCES ITS NEW DISPLAY 
ADVERTISING RATES: 

Full Page $250 1/3 Page $95 

2/3 Page $190 Ve Page $50 

1/2 Page $135 1 Col., 3 in $35 

Inside Back Cover: Full Page, $350; 2/3 Page, $250; 
Half Page, $190; 1/3 Page, $140. 
Agencies get 15% discount. If you want to reach 
over 11,000 people in and around New York, get 
in touch with David Kelston, WBAI, 30 E. 39th 
Street, New York City. Telephone OX 7-2288. 

SI McAVOY 
Contemporary Interiors 

248 East 21st Street 

New York, New York 

AL 4-1309 

THE MAPLES— INFORMAL ADULT RESORT: Con- 
genial, cultured atmosphere, wholesome, plenti- 
ful meals, Folk and Social dancing, spring-fed 
swimming pool, 150 acres, unspoiled country- 
side. 

COMPLETE 2 DAY WEEKEND 

$25 

RESERVE NOW: 

NEW YORK CITY Phone TR 5-6511 

THE MAPLES, FERNDALE, N. Y. 

Phone (914) 292-5996 

FOLK GUITAR 

Learn traditional American styles quickly and 
almost painlessly from ROY BERKELEY (Folk- 
ways and Coral Records). 

CH 2-4972 or AL 5-0593 

LICENSED SPEACH TEACHER, 
BEL CANTO SINGER 

seeks pupils — adults, 

children, lyric sopranos. 

ULster 8-3607 

PIANO, YES $3 A LESSON 

Your will to work more important 
than your present knowledge 
KAREL PACHTA 877-2299 

— Steinway Piano 
(Also available: complete training with examina- 
tions, public performances and diploma; $50 a 
month — and your skills.) 

— Master lessons: $10 an hour — 
Master classes available to groups. 

UNDERGROUND UPLIFT UNLIMITED, 

a division of FREE SPEECH INC., 

is the closest thing to a WBAI — 

anything-goes store around. 

ST. PHILOMENA: A NIGHTMARE IN NIRVANA 

now available on record (uncut) IV2 hrs. 

for just $3.00. 

Wild selection of EXTREMIST PUBLICATIONS 

BUTTONS— wholesale to all 

FREE mail order CATALOGUE on reauest 

UNDERGROUND UPLIFT UNLIMITED, 

28 St. Marks Place, N. Y. C. 10003 

(Across from THE DOM & the ELECTRIC CIRCUS) 

Open 7 days a week. 

Larry Siegel 

Star Bagelman 

In Residence 

CORT COFFEE SHOP— 10 E. 39 St. 

MU 3-9315 



CONTEMPORARY 

AMERICAN 

ART 

IN ALL MEDIA 

192 W. 4th Street 

Tues. to Sat., 10:30 to 6:30 
(Expert Framing on the Premises) 



Kgjtnw 



W/fflmV 



"THE GOTHAM ITES are an educational group 

which schedules unusual visits and events. 

Free brochure — Wl 7-6900." 

Do you miss Morris U. Schappes' WBAI 

COMMENTARY ON JEWISH AFFAIRS? 

ONLY ONE DOLLAR 

BRINGS YOU 3 MONTHS 

OF JEWISH CURRENTS 

The Monthly Magazine edited by Mr. Schappes 

HIGHLIGHTS OF THE JULY-AUGUST ISSUE 

The Middle East Crisis (15 Pages): 

For Israeli-Arab Negotiations — an Editorial. 

The Middle East Explosion on the Eve by 

Morris U. Schappes. 

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